What Is Proposal?

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A proposal is an essential marketing document that helps cultivate an initial professional relationship between an organization and a donor over a project to be implemented. The proposal outlines the plan of the implementing organization about the project, giving extensive information about the intention, for implementing it, the ways to manage it and the results to be delivered from it.

The Top 5 Proposal Types are:

1. Grant Proposals - For funding proposals to all levels of government. Grant Writing Proposal Kit

2. Business Proposals - For all types of business proposals. Business Proposal Kit

3. Technical Proposals - Research, academic, business and government. Professional Proposal Kit

4. Project Proposals - For all types of projects - all sectors. Project Proposal Kit

5. Sales Proposals - For all types of products and services. Sales Proposal Kit

In addition to the above list of most popular proposal types, the following is a list of other proposal types that many people also need help writing:

Construction proposals
Training proposals
Thesis proposals
Book proposals
Technical proposals
Show proposals
Building proposals
Development proposals
Network proposals
Event proposals
Idea proposals
Exhibition proposals
Design proposals
Sponsorship proposals
Museum proposals
Show proposals
and more...

The Importance of Proposals

As a future professional, Proposal is important to me because.. It contains selected critical elements that must be pointed out to have a greater possibility of persuading the company ot the employee. It also give me a better focus on the topic I intend to write about. It helps me to organize my thoughts, points, and sources. Not only are proposals helpful to professionals, they are also very helpful to those who will later read the finished product. They can serve as a preview of the topic at hand and are a great way for the reader to get a general idea of the direction a paper will take.


I. Introduction and Theoretical Framework

A. “The introduction is the part of the paper that provides readers with the background information for the research reported in the paper. Its purpose is to establish a framework for the research, so that readers can understand how it is related to other research” (Wilkinson, 1991, p. 96).

B. In an introduction, the writer should

1. create reader interest in the topic,
2. lay the broad foundation for the problem that leads to the study, 3. place the study within the larger context of the scholarly literature, and 4. reach out to a specific audience. (Creswell, 1994, p. 42)

C. If a researcher is working within a particular theoretical framework/line of inquiry, the theory or line of inquiry should be introduced and discussed early, preferably in the introduction or literature review. Remember that the theory/line of inquiry selected will inform the statement of the problem, rationale for the study, questions and hypotheses, selection of instruments, and choice of methods. Ultimately, findings will be discussed in terms of how they relate to the theory/line of inquiry that undergirds the study.

D. Theories, theoretical frameworks, and lines of inquiry may be differently handled in quantitative and qualitative endeavors.
1. “In quantitative studies, one uses theory deductively and places it toward the beginning of the plan for a study. The objective is to test or verify theory. One thus begins the study advancing a theory, collects data to test it, and reflects on whether the theory was confirmed or disconfirmed by the results in the study. The theory becomes a framework for the entire study, an organizing model for the research questions or hypotheses for the data collection procedure” (Creswell, 1994, pp....
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