What did women do in world war 1

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What did women do in world war 1

By | November 2013
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As men left jobs to fight overseas, they were replaced by women. Women filled many jobs brought into existence by wartime needs. As a result the number of women employed increased from 3,224,600 in July, 1914 to 4,814,600 in January 1918. Nearly 200,000 women were employed in government departments. Half a million became clerical workers in private offices. Women worked as conductors on trams and buses. A quarter of a million worked on the land. The greatest increase of women workers was in engineering. Over 700,000 of these women worked in the highly dangerous munitions industry. Industries that had previously excluded women now welcomed them. There was a particular demand for women to do heavy work such as unloading coal, stoking furnaces and building ships. Women moved into the labour force to fill this need. During World War I, for example, thousands of women worked in munitions factories, offices and large hangars used to build aircrafts. Of course women were also involved in knitting socks and preparing hampers for the soldiers on the front, as well as other voluntary work, but as a matter of survival women had to work for paid employment for the sake of their families. Munitions workers were the dangerous jobs. They had to encounter with many dangerous weapons. One mistake and the whole factory blows up. Many toxic dust will harm you suck as blinding you for the whole day and changing your skin colour. Their lives changed and they were more independent, earning money, becoming more visible and being part of the army. Nurses, this is one of the popular jobs in World War 1. They had to treat injured soldiers and give them medicine. Stay a trench behind the front line. This was dangerous standing behind the front line because shells and machine guns can be fired and the shrapnel that comes and of the shell might fly in to the trench behind the front line.