What Created the Differences Between the North and South with Respect to Slavery

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During colonial times immigrants from Europe discovered more opportunities in the Northern colonies, making immigrant labor less available in the South. As the amount of workers decreased, the southern colonies needed a new source of labor to work in the vast fields of the plantations. The large sugarcane and tobacco plantations required more labor than any other place in the Americas. About half of the slaves exported to the colonies went to the sugar plantations. The profits on sugar were high, and the costs were low. This allowed masters to work slaves brutally, and to cause the deaths of most of them since they could afford to simply buy more. the tobacco plantations required vast amounts of hand labor, and thus required slave labor to work in the fields. The rice and indigo fields in the wouth also relied on slave labor. In the lower south, cattle raisers used slaves from farm animal societies who had helpful experience in these matters. Slavery was a very significant part of life in the south.

Slavery was much less important in the Northern colonies. There were not as many fields to be worked, and therefore slavery was not such an important part of life. The difference in the amount of slaves shipped to the Northern and Southern colonies was immense. Only one out of twenty slaves ended up in the Northern colonies. Even then the work load was not nearly as brutal. Slaves were centered mostly in the port cities, and worked on the docks. Slaves did help on the small farms, but there were never very many of them on the same farm. There were also slaves working on the dairy and cattle ranches. Overall though, slavery was centered in the South.
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