What's Make an Effective Hrm

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Course Study Guide
Part 1: Course Info
2012–13

International HRM
INDU1130

Contents

1.Welcome3
2.Introduction to the Course4
2.1Introduction and Rationale4
2.2Aims4
2.3Learning Outcomes4
2.4Learning and Teaching Activities4
3.Contact Details5
4.Course Content6
5.Assessment Details8
5.1Summary of assessment8
5.2Assignment one – Group presentation and individual report8 5.3Assignment two – Essay11
5.4Final Examination13
5.5Resit Assessment13
6.Reading13
6.1Core Textbooks13
6.2Supplementary Reading14
6.3Other Sources15
7.Other Details15
8.Feedback sheets15
9. Past Exam Papers18
1.Welcome

Dear student,
Welcome to the final-year course International Human Resource Management. We hope that you will enjoy the course. This course, which is an option for students on the BABM and other programmes, assumes no detailed prior knowledge of the field of human resources management. This course handbook explains how the course is organised and what the assessments are. It also lists the lecture and tutorial topics. Tutorials accompany the weekly lectures, and are designed to deepen your understanding of the topic using real-life examples. We expect you to attend all lectures and tutorials, and to do all the prescribed reading (detailed in section six) – generally, you have to read one chapter per week from the course textbook. This course deals with the question how organisations (private-sector companies as well as public sector organisations) manage people, in particular how they motivate employees to achieve the high standards of performance required in today's competitive markets. The course also deals with the wider social, economic, political and historic context within which organisations operate. The course is split into two parts: The first term introduces you to Human Resource Management (HRM), while the second term introduces Employment Relations (ER), sometimes also called Industrial Relations (IR). Both fields are closely related, but focus at different aspects of the employment relationship (the relationship between employer and employees). HRM focuses mainly at the company level, while ER also investigates the national (and international) levels; and while HRM focuses more on individual employees, ER concentrates more on groups of employees and their representatives, trade unions. Human resource management is both an academic theory and a business practice. It is based on the notion that employees are humans, and thus should not be treated as a basic “business resource” (despite the name “human resource management”). HRM focuses on the human aspect of a company and its strategic importance. HRM is, supposedly, very different from traditional "personnel management”, which is a purely administrative function. HRM is much more than the pure administration of personnel and their contracts (e.g. wages, payment systems, and working hours). HRM deals with topics such as employee involvement (i.e. giving employees a say at work) and motivation. Employment relations or industrial relations focuses on the wider relations between management and workers, particularly groups of workers represented by trade unions, and the structure of labour markets. Industrial relations can take place on many levels, such as the “shop-floor” (i.e. at the level of the factory or office), the regional level, or the national level. Governments set the framework for industrial relations through legislation and regulations. The climate and institutions of industrial relations vary considerably between countries, being more “cooperative” in some (e.g. Germany and Japan) and more “adversarial” in others (e.g. the US, the UK and France). Again, We hope that you will enjoy the course and find it useful! Good luck!Niels-E. Wergin-Cheek (course leader)and the course team| |

2.Introduction to the Course
2.1Introduction and Rationale
Human resources are being recognised...
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