Wgu Jdt Task 3

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Running head: JDT TASK 3

JDT TASK 3
Western Governors University
Human Resources

JDT TASK 3
A. Benefits of Performance Appraisal Systems
Optimal results of a well prepared and well developed employee appraisal: The processes demonstrates a commitment to people within the business by showing them that they are valued members of the company and their success is important to the entire organization. Formal employee appraisals provide a strong reinforcement of the corporate aims and values. It gives managers an opportunity to show employees how their individual roles contribute to the company goals and give feedback to the impact that the employee has on those goals. It also provides management with a solid forum for teaching and reinforcing corporate values, the right and the wrong way to get the job done. Appraisals provide management with an opportunity for talent spotting and succession planning. Appraisals identify the high performers who can then be nurtured and developed for future roles and also identifies skill sets and competencies that can be developed to help the employee grow and the company prepare for the future. For managers, appraisals can be an opportunity to consider exactly what their expectations are for each individual member of staff, and to identify reasonable and realistic objectives as a result.  Appraisals also provide an opportunity to cement relationships and for managers to find out where their staff needs support, in order to enable them to do their job well. Above all else, it is a time where good information can be gathered from those in the front line, thus enabling the manager to make better decisions going forward.  For the individual member of staff this is an opportunity to discuss their job, to have a voice, so to speak. They can clarify expectations and objectives. They can raise issues, including possible career aspirations. Managers should see to make it easy and safe for staff to not only raise issues, but also suggest solutions. A good question for managers to throw in the mix is, 'If we could do one thing differently here, what would it be?'(Help With Management, 2009, p. 3)

Pre appraisal activities
Set a calendar date and time in advance that is mutually convenient for both you and the employee, and that will allow enough time for each of you to do preparation. Plan a location that will allow for privacy and no interruptions. Be sure to schedule enough time for discussion, it is recommended to plan for at least an hour.

Gather the following information:
* the job description and performance standards
* goals set from the last appraisal
* work rules and procedures
* your documentation notes
* any feedback or letters from customers/co-workers
* current disciplinary memos
* the previous performance appraisal

If you have asked the employee to do a self-appraisal, be sure to obtain that early enough so you have a chance to review it as a part of your preparation. It is also suggested that you provide the employee a draft of your appraisal, so the employee may review it ahead of time, as well.

Before filling out the appraisal form, take a moment to:
* list the main areas of responsibility
* what the employee has done well
* what the employee needs to improve in
* what you can do to help the employee do a better job

Remember to avoid:
* Halo Effect - tendency to overrate a favored employee, or an employee who had a prior good rating * Horns Effect - tendency to rate an employee lower than circumstances warrant * Recency Error- letting outstanding work [or unsatisfactory work] immediately prior to the evaluation offset an entire year of performance * Cookie Cutter Effect - not focusing on individual specific performance and rating all your employees, or groups of employees the same (Martin, 2007, p. 23)

How to Follow Up after a Job Performance Appraisal...
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