Wetland Treatment

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  • Topic: Marsh, Wetland, Salt marsh
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  • Published : March 4, 2013
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11/15/12
Wetland Treatment
Environmental Systems
Adam Pittman
Bluefield State College
11/15/12
Wetland Treatment
Environmental Systems
Adam Pittman
Bluefield State College

Adam Pittman
Environmental Systems
Wetland Treatment

A very important aspect in civil engineering is dealing with projects that contain wetland treatment. Wetland treatment is a very touchy matter in most environmental practices across the country and must be dealt with according to law in order to preserve wildlife and natural ecosystems that do so much to benefit engineering projects as a whole and society. Wetlands have many different construction properties and techniques that must be considered creating many problems in the engineering construction process which is a reason why wetland treatment needs to be dealt with the proper way by all parties. Essentially, wetland treatment is a top focus and concern because of its ecological factors and its construction hindrance.

Wetlands are found all across the world on every continent except Antarctica from the snowy tundra to the hot tropics. Because of the Clean Water Act, the term wetland means “those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs and similar areas.” (Clean Water Act) Wetlands are a dangerous and all projects built on or near one should be cautious of potential failure due to flooding. A good question to ask is why wetlands are valuable if they cause so much potential harm in the building world? The answer is because they are important to the ecosystem and animals that inhabit that ecosystem such as fish, birds, and other wildlife. The animals in the ecosystem are important to our environment because they provide different positive impacts on the surrounding land. “More than one-third of the United States' threatened and endangered species live only in wetlands, and nearly half use wetlands at some point in their lives. Many other animals and plants depend on wetlands for survival. Estuarine and marine fish and shellfish, various birds, and certain mammals must have coastal wetlands to survive. The following is a bird migratory graph from major wetlands to other major wetlands. http://www.americaswetland.com/custompage.cfm?pageid=125

Most commercial and game fish breed and raise their young in coastal marshes and estuaries. Menhaden, flounder, sea trout, spot, croaker, and striped bass are among the more familiar fish that depend on coastal wetlands. Shrimp, oysters, clams, and blue and Dungeness crabs likewise need these wetlands for food, shelter, and breeding grounds. For many animals and plants, like wood ducks, muskrat, cattails, and swamp rose, inland wetlands are the only places they can live. Beaver may actually create their own wetlands. For others, such as striped bass, peregrine falcon, otter, black bear, raccoon, and deer, wetlands provide important food, water, or shelter. Many of the U.S. breeding bird populations-- including ducks, geese, woodpeckers, hawks, wading birds, and many song-birds-- feed, nest, and raise their young in wetlands. Migratory waterfowl use coastal and inland wetlands as resting, feeding, breeding, or nesting grounds for at least part of the year. Indeed, an international agreement to protect wetlands of international importance was developed because some species of migratory birds are completely dependent on certain wetlands and would become extinct if those wetlands were destroyed.” (EPA). Wetlands also provide other services besides wildlife preservation. They protect water quality and can also be used to store floodwaters.

There are many economic benefits of wetlands that should be noted. Wetlands increase the drinking water quality in many rivers, creeks, streams, and any...
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