Westminister System of Government in Melanesia

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THE WESTMINISTER SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT IN MELENESIA
The beginning of colonization was an era seen in which colonized territories began learning and adopting the styles and the systems of their colonizers. The colonizers especially the Europeans bring in new types of ideas which are now seen as parallel to the old system that has been existed for almost the rest of the entire life before being contact with the Europeans. Thus throughout the world people experience different types of colonial contact and the way their territories were administered with different model of governance being adopted. The places around the globe experience different types of governance in which nationalism was the force behind these which sought for self governance. However the pacific island countries have gained independence in which they adopt their own preferred modelled as the Westminster from Great Britain and the presidential system from the United States and from French. However this essay will outline the Westminster system and the functions in which the Melanesian countries have adopted and exercised the system on their own where the Melanesian system or politics also existed.

The Westminster system is a democratic parliamentary system of government modelled after the politics of the United Kingdom. This term comes from the Palace of Westminster, the seat of Parliament of the United Kingdom. Most of the procedures of the Westminster system have originated with the conventions, practices and precedents of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which are a part of what is known as the Constitution of the United Kingdom. Unlike the uncodified or unwritten British constitution, most countries that use the Westminster system have codified system in which they have written constitution to govern themself without external influence or control. However uncodified principles, practices and precedents continue to play a significant role in most countries as many constitutions do not specify important elements of procedure. For instance some older constitutions using the Westminster system do not mention the existence of the cabinet and or the prime minister, because these offices were taken for granted by the authors of these constitutions. Sometimes these conventions, reserve powers and other influences collide in times of crisis, and in such times the weaknesses of the unwritten aspects of the Westminster system, as well as the strengths of the Westminster system's flexibility are put to the test in parliament.

Important features of the Westminster system include the following, although not all of the following aspects have been preserved in every Westminster-derived system but only few were preserved in the codified constitution of many independent democratic countries who have adopted the British constitution. Many independent states were granted independence by their former colonizers in which they were guaranteed their political rights to govern themselves with their own national rights. And hence these are the Westminster features which guaranteed a nation state of its own with their own codified constitution that came under British rule adopted the Westminster system. A sovereign or head of state is the nominal or legal and constitutional holder of executive power, and holds numerous reserve powers in the operation of the government, but whose daily duties mainly consist of performing ceremonial functions. Examples include Queen Elizabeth II, the Governor-General in independent Commonwealth countries, or the presidents of many countries and state/provincial governors in republican federal systems. And the head of government (or head of the executive) was known as the Prime Minister (PM). While the head of government is appointed by the head of state in which the constitutional...
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