Were the Crusades Justified?

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Were the Crusades Justified?
In the case of the Crusades, the true jurisdictional limitation of the Church of Rome’s authoritative order was infinite beyond that of state or feudal control. It would seem that an “infinite jurisdiction” by any entity is unjust! The only possible rationale for having such unlimited authority would be an innate belief in “entitlement” or “unrestricted sovereignty.” The differences

The Crusades were a succession of many wars, which “originally” started as a request from Alexius II for aid after a devastating war in the Battle of Mazikert. This war had taken its ravishing toll on the Greeks in the Middle East. The Battle of Mazikert was a result of the expansion and occupancy of two conflicting empires that had come into contact with each other. The major primary differences between the two empires were their ethic origin and religious backgrounds. One side was Christian while other was Muslim. The Christians were predominately white and the Muslims were of Asiatic descent. The Christians were apart of the eastern

empire of Byzantium [also known as the Roman or Greek Empire]. The oppositional force [the Muslims] was the Seljuk Turks. The Seljuk Turks were a group of people that had conquered the majority of Persian during this period of time. The Byzantium Empire had maintained a mighty imperial rule since the days of Greek mythology, but had fallen into great distress after suffering defeat in the battle against the Seljuk Turks fought in the city of Manzikert. Because of such feats, the Seljuk Turks had gained a fearful reputation as a newfound threat to European ruled territories in the Middle East and Northern Africa. Although, the Byzantium Empire was in a battle of imperial conflict [the Byzantium Empire versus Seljuk Turks] the allied force that the leaders of the Byzantium called upon was not that of another empire, but of the Roman Catholic Church. The “Holy” Empire

Jerusalem was the birthplace of Christ and was “the...
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