Weighing the Costs

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A.Charlene Robinson disagrees with Sowell in her essay “Weighing the Costs”, who tries to intrigue the reader to see as he does. She states that he does not provide the evidence of cost and other problems to lead the reader to agree with him. There is not enough evidence and shows mostly Sowell’s personal assumptions to back up his writing. Sowell does not give substantial amount of proof to leave the reader unwilling to dispute his claims in regard to the nation’s deficit, the college bound, and the importance of continued education (171).

B. Robinson’s first sub claim is that “Sowell’s portrait of student-loan recipients is questionable” (172). She then states “Another set of assumptions in the essay has to do with “scarcity” (172). Robinson finishes her sub claims with “The most fundamental and most debatable assumption underlying Sowell’s essay is that higher education is a kind of commodity that not everyone is entitled to” (172).

C.Robinson gets the reader to stop and ponder exactly where Sowell has gathered his information. There should be more detail to prove there is not enough funds and what it’s cost are compared to other programs of importance. There is much evidence throughout that shows inconsistency of the facts and what Sowell see’s as reality. Robinson picks through the entire essay and is able to justify why the educated reader should further investigate the claims to be illegitimate. She is able to emotionally connect with Sowell and his motives but gracefully leads the reader to more in depth understanding of the mistakes made by Sowell. Robinson is then able to come full circle and bring the essay to a close with the importance of having an educated people. By not giving the opportunity to further their education, being uneducated is even more detrimental.
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