Weeee!

Page 1 of 3

Weeee!

By | September 2006
Page 1 of 3
The Influence of Knowledge, Opinion, and Propaganda upon History
Today's world is full of various sources of knowledge. However, not all of these sources provide adequately accurate information. Obtaining valid, truthful, and factual knowledge is almost backbreaking. Finding a source that lacks some sort of unreliable information is next to impossible. With the emergence of the term "internet" in the 1990s, one more source of knowledge was added to the already existing list which includes philosophers, scientists, politicians, organizations, the media, etc. The major problem with finding a reliable source of information is that there are no definite criteria for comparing one source to another. Another problem is the classification of the type of information obtained from a source. There are several types – the sought after knowledge, the unreliable opinion, and the compelling propaganda. These classifications are hidden within almost every source and must be distinguished by the person who is attempting to obtain truthful information in order to figure out whether the source is actually valid.

The primary criterion that categorizes sources is the truth value. To be able to determine the truth value of a source it is necessary to understand the definition of truth. Truth is defined as conformity to fact or actuality. Fact is defined as in reality, truth, and actuality. Reality is defined as the quality of being actual or true. Actuality means the state of being actual, factual, and real. One can not be defined without the other so it is evident that these definitions create a problem since they are not completely clear. Therefore every person can have his own definition of truth. However, most people's definitions will be somewhat similar – truth is a statement proven or accepted to be true (it is based on fact). Frederich Nietzsche once said, "there are no facts, only interpretations." If this statement is true (which means that it is a...