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wedding cakes

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The History of Wedding Cakes
The origin of the wedding cake can be traced as far back as the Roman Empire, when icing was not invented. Originally they were made of wheat which was a symbol of fertility and prosperity. Through the years, the wedding cake has become the focus of a variety of custom traditions. The custom of breaking the cake over the bride’s head is no longer practiced. Breaking the bread symbolized the breaking of the bride’s virginal state and the subsequent dominance of the groom over her. The guests would try and obtain a crumb for themselves as they too believed they would then share in the good fortune and future prosperity of the couple. The tradition disappeared quickly in some places. In Medieval England cakes were described as flour based sweet foods. There is no proof on how cakes appeared at wedding ceremonies. However, there are stories involving small sweet buns in a large pile in front of the newlyweds. The couple would attempt to kiss over the pile, with success being a sign of a lot of children in their future. Eventually, the idea of stacking them neatly and frosting them together was adopted as a more convenient option. In the early 19th century, the bride’s pie was a popular dish. It first appeared in the mid-17th century. The pie was filled with sweet breads, a mince pie, or just a simple mutton pie. The main ingredient was a glass ring. A resource claimed that the women who found the ring would be the next to marry. The bride’s pie disappeared in the late 19th century and wedding cakes became popular. The groom’s cake was discovered in early American ceremonies. The cake was usually dark to contrast with the bride’s cake. It appeared at the reception along with the wedding cake. The tradition of the groom’s cake is unclear, but it seems to have survived in the south. Early cakes were simple single-tiered plum cakes, with some variations. There was also an unusual tradition of sleeping with a piece of wedding cake...