Web Development

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S E T T I N G T H E S TA G E

Planning a Web Development Project

Presented by: Kelly Goto kelly@gotomedia.com kgoto@aol.com (415) 957-7701 session url www.gotomedia.com/atlanta00/stage

Cool cover illustration by Eunice Moyle

SESSION OUTLINE

1.0

The Project: Introduction

2.0

Before You Start: The Client

3.0

The Proposal: The Development Process

4.0

Estimating: Time and Resources 4.1 4.2 The Budget: Estimating by Hours The Budget: Estimating by Task

5.0

Creative Brief: Defining Scope

6.0

Competitive Analysis: Informal Research

7.0

Forms & Worksheets: Blank Forms to Use

8.0

The Proposal: Detailed Overview 8.1 8.2 8.3 Proposal Format: Informal Letter Proposal Format: Detailed Plan Expectations and Follow-Up

©1999 Gotomedia, All Rights Reserved

1.0

T H E P R O J E C T: I n t ro d u c t i o n

Setting the Stage: Determining Scope You have a potential project that has just dropped into your lap. The client (or your boss) asks you the deadly question: “How much time is this going to take, and how much is it going to cost?” What is the first step you take SETTING THE STA G E

in identifying the actual costs and timing associated with the project? How much information do you need up front in order to generate a realistic proposal? What other elements do you need to incorporate into the proposal to ensure you can say “yes” to the project without getting into over your head? This handout has been developed to help you make the right decisions and organize your existing information in a comprehensive manner allowing you to properly identify scope, budget and timing to “set the stage” before beginning an actual Web project.

Before actually starting a Web site, there are several steps which can be taken to ensure the success of your project.In this session,we will cover the key elements in determining size, scope, budget and scheduling for your project. We will also cover additional items such as conducting an informal competitive analysis, and writing a creative brief. Whether you are an independent designer wearing multiple hats, or an internal Webmaster overseeing a team of people, many of the processes outlined here can be implemented into your existing workflow. INCLUDED IN THIS SESSION

How Much is Enough? How much time do you put in before you actually are awarded the project? What additional components have you budgeted and scheduled for, including competitive analysis and usability testing? The answer is directly related to time and money. You have been given a task. What does your expertise and time allow in order for it to be successful? By taking preliminary action to properly define the project and set up proper expectations with the client, you will save yourself time and trouble in the end. The more experience you have in creating sites, the more predicting and troubleshooting you can do to save yourself unnecessary expense. The problem is, we don’t often take the time to properly define the scope of a project. You can use the time now, or later. It is up to you.

Items which will be covered in this handout are as follows:
THE PROJECT THE CLIENT THE PROPOSAL E S T I M AT I N G C R E ATIVE BRIEF COMPETITIVE ANALY S I S FORMS

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©1999 Gotomedia, All Rights Reserved

B E F O R E Y O U S TA RT: T h e C l i e n t

1.0

CLIENT QUESTIONNAIRE

Use the questionnaire supplied in the handout for “Web Design Workflow”to send to your client prior to starting the job. Modify questions to fit the specific needs of the project you are working on. Questions are organized into key categories, including:

Send the Client Questionnaire At the earliest opportunity, send the potential client your customized questionnaire (see “workflow handouts” in earlier session) to gather information and estimate the scope and details of the project. The individuals or companies who take the time to answer the questions in detail score higher/on the “good client...
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