Weapons Accountability

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Weapons Accountability in the Military
The history of weapons started centuries ago when cave people initially developed a weapon called a bow and arrow, for hunting purposes. They created this weapon from yew or elm for the bow and the arrow’s shaft, and used animal ligaments, or sinew to add tension to the bow. Archeologists have also found arrow heads made of sharp rocks and angled bones from different types of animals. These artifacts are all over the world displayed beautifully in museums to make new civilization realize the important role weapons have played in daily life. The next major improvement in weapons technology came from the Chinese civilization, the inventers of gun powder. Initially used for the purpose of demolition for construction. Soon, the possibilities of gun powder led to the installation of powder on the tips of arrows to make arrow travel faster and more powerful. “During the 8th century Tang dynasty, sulphur and saltpeter were first combined with charcoal to create an explosive called huoyao or gunpowder.” Looking at the vast past history of weapons as a source survival either for hunting or to destroy your opponent in face to face combat, it is very important to have a possession of one at all times. It is especially important to possess your weapon in proper working order at all times in a combat zone. So now the question arises that what happens if you don’t have your weapon with you when in need or having one but leaving your weapon unattended. The following questions come to mind: 1. What’s the worst that could happen?

2. Why does it happen in the first place, and to a SOLDIER, of all people? 3. What can we learn from it?
4. How do we ensure that this never happens to us or those in our group? The worst that could happen is for an enemy combatant (at home or abroad) to take your weapon and use it against you or your battle buddies. Frankly, I don’t know which is worse: losing one’s life to one’s own weapon, or...
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