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Where we come from...an essay describing the first multi-cellular...

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Where we come from...an essay describing the first multi-cellular organism.

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Where we come from

The most ancient question people probably have been asking since B.C times would be, "Where do we come from?" Not who was our grandma or who before that. I mean where did all animals come from? How did we become so diverse? Why do I look like this and that tree like that? These questions aren't uncommon. Many scientists over the years pondered the thought and honestly couldn't figure it out.

After the beginning of the earth, two and a half billion years later, the first organism began to from. They were just one-celled and had no function. Soon after lots of time the cells began working together to form the first actual living thing. What did this new being look like? It had to be very simple and probably have no bones, not a nervous system, or a head or brain. It had to have been very simple and easy to get through life. What could this animal have been?

Paleontologist found the earliest or oldest fossil that was of something they couldn't explain. Only years later did someone found out that the fossil pieces resembled the spores of a sponge. When a sponge is first approached, it may seem lifeless. However, inside of the sponge is a world of cells working together each doing what task they want. This is different from most animals because our cells each have one task that it performs and it cannot switch from task to task.

The sponge has a very neat way of eating. The tiny holes in the "skin" of the sponge catch food particles in water flowing through it. The particles are carried through the sponge and into a chamber where cells called coanasites thrive. They act like tiny hearts with flagella or a whip like tail to project the particles forward. Also sponges are refuge for tiny fish or shrimp and also a free food section for cucumbers. They just eat the particles that were too big for the sponge to eat.

In biology there are six major themes in which most biologist study under. Most of the themes were used in finding out where...