We Can Fight in a War, but Can't Have a Drink?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 689
  • Published : December 2, 2009
Open Document
Text Preview
People have always told me that high school and college would be the best times of my life. Not only do young adults get to venture off from home on their own during college, but they finally get to make their own decisions without having to wait for the approval from a parent. Yes, high school was very fun, but for some reason it just can’t be compared to college life. What else could possibly be the blame for this other than the parties? College parties are very outgoing, but they also create a demographic for college students under the age of twenty-one. The legal drinking age should be changed from twenty-one to eighteen. Not only would it create more buyers in a struggling economy, but it just makes the most logical sense in a country where anyone eighteen or over is considered an adult.

In 1987 the United States passed a law mandating all states to have a twenty-one year old alcohol purchase age. This means over half of college students are not legal to buy alcohol. College kids are college kids though, and one way or another they are going to get their alcohol. Many people, myself included, believe that the legal drinking age should be changed from twenty-one to eighteen. “An 18-year-old is afforded, among other things, the right to vote, the right to marry, and the ability to serve in the military” (Engs, Heath, Levine, Smith). In the United States an eighteen year old is considered an adult, yet eighteen year olds are not completely treated like adults. They should be able to make their own choices at this age, and buying and consuming alcohol is one of these choices. Even with all the arguments, the legal drinking age in the United States is still twenty-one due to many arguments against the idea of age change. Many people believe that eighteen year olds are not responsible enough to make correct decisions involving alcohol....
tracking img