We'Re of the Future

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We're of the Future
"Hello, I am you, and you are me. This is a projection of the past, future, and present of the human race. This is a record of what could have been, and what has happened. Welcome to the data base," the fading robotic voice crackled into static as it echoed over the vast land, the dry waterless surface void of any other sign of life. This is a grim mix of two possible futures, and what can become in a mere hundred years. As technology grows and is perfected, landscapes and lives are dramatically changed. If the human race continues on the path it has created, then the future will be closer to the past. Unless humans change their views and ideals into something that creates instead of destroys, the planet will be irreversibly changed. To dare take a chance at understanding the future, the past first, must be understood. From the very moment of Earth's beginning its history has been littered with violence and tragedy, an ever changing world of shifting climates and topography, but no change has happened as quickly as it is now. In the past huge climate changes would take out large numbers of creatures in every walk of life. There has been five major mass extinctions (4), the term used to express a large number of living species dying , since the beginning of living organisms. Many different causes have been proposed for each one, but one thing ties them all together. A large change in the environment coincided with each mass death all the way back to the first one. The first mass extinction happened about 440 million years ago at the end of the Ordovician period. Twenty-five present of the living families, animal and plant life, disappeared. It seems to have been causes by extremely rapid global cooling. (11) The second came around 370 million years ago near the end of Devonian period. It to is believed to have been caused by climate change as well. Seventy percent of marine life was lost. (11) Ninety to ninety-five percent of life was lost...
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