Watson Theory Paper

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Watson's Theory of Caring
Jane Padilla
NUR/403
January 15, 2013
Julie Ann Hankins

This paper will talk about Dr. Jean Watson, her theory background, and will provide the concepts of her theory.   Furthermore, I will connect the theory to person, health, nursing, and environment of the caring moment and apply a transpersonal relationship and relate these issues within my Practice, skills and experience. Dr. Jean Watson was born in a small town in West Virginia in 1940s. She began her career as a diploma nurse, and received her baccalaureate in nursing in the 1960s. Dr. Jean continued her education and earned her master’s degree in psychiatric-mental health, and received her doctorate in education in the 1970s.  Dr. Jean Watson has written several books discussing about her philosophy and her theory of human caring. Watson’s theory of caring was developed in between 1975 and 1979, when she was teaching at the University of Colorado, the theory was first published in 1979, and is focused on human caring. Watson defines her theory to be developed by her own opinions of nursing experience, and as a grouping of materials she established throughout her upper education years. It was also influenced by her involvement with the nursing curriculum at the University of Colorado. “It was my initial attempt to bring meaning and focus to nursing as an emerging discipline and distinct health profession with its own unique values, knowledge and practices, with its own ethic and mission to society” (Watson, 2004). Watson’s Theory of Human Care is focused towards personal inner healing and an individual life’s experiences. The theory involves three major conceptual elements. The 10 carative factors, the development and utilization of transpersonal caring relationship, and the caring occasion or caring event 1. The carative factors. These factors were developed in 1979 and reviewed in 1985 and 1988. Dr. Jean Watson regarded the carative factors as the monitor for the essential of nursing and the nursing profession. She uses the term carative to differentiate with conventional medicine’s curative factors. Her carative factors attempt to “honor the human dimensions of nursing’s work and the inner life world and subjective experiences of the people we serve” (Watson, 1997b, p. 50). The 10 carative factors are. 1. The formation of a humanistic-altruistic system of values. 2. The instillation of faith-hope.

3. The cultivation of sensitivity to one’s self and to others. 4. The development of a helping-trusting relationship.
5. The promotion and acceptance of the expression of positive and negative feelings. 6. The systematic use of the scientific problem-solving method for decision making. 7. The promotion of interpersonal teaching-learning.

8. The provision for a supportive, protective, and (or) corrective mental, physical, sociocultural, and spiritual environment. 9. Assistance with the gratification of human needs.
10. The allowance for existential-phenomenological forces. (Watson, 1985, p. 9-10) 2. The development and utilization of transpersonal caring relationship. This idea focuses that the nurse must refer to a patient by trying to study his or her inner feelings. The concept touches beyond the physical needs of the patient. It defines the skills of the nurse to see outside the objective needs and to demonstrate concern towards the patient’s inner sense. 3. The caring occasion or caring event. “An event, such as an actual occasion of human care, is a focal point in space and time from which experience and perception are taking place, but the actual occasion of caring has a field of its own that is greater than the occasion itself” (Watson, 1985) each meeting has the chance to be a caring event, and a caring moment. The caring moment includes hard decisions that have to be decided by the patient and the nurse. Theory application related to actual...
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