Water Hyacinth as Food for Rabbit

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  • Topic: Molasses, Rabbit, Sugar
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  • Published : May 28, 2013
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waty DRIED WATER HYACINTH (Eichhornia crassipes) LEAVES
AS FOOD FOR Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit) MIXED WITH
SUGAR CANE (Saccharum officinarum) MOLASSES

This Science Investigatory Project
Is Presented to
The Science and Technology Department
Pedro Guevara Memorial National High School
As Partial Fulfillment
In The Subject Research II

By:
Tristan Jan A. Seraspi
Rexter A. Marqueses
Prince Emmanuel C. Gauna
2013
IV-ZARA

Chapter I
THE PROBLEM
Introduction
Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is free-floating perennial aquatic plant (hydrophyte) native to tropical and sub-tropical continents. With broad, thick, glossy, ovate leaves. They have long, spongy and bulbous stalks. An erect stalk supports a single spike of 8-15 conspicuously attractive flowers, mostly lavender to pink in color with six petals. Mostly unlike here in the Philippines these free-floating plants are wastes, they the cause of the flash-floods that destroys our houses, they block the way that the water will flow mostly in the river side.

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is a tropical, perennial grass that forms lateral shoots at the base to produce multiple stems, typically three to four meters high and about five cm in diameter. The stems grow into cane stalk, which when mature constitutes approximately 75% of the entire plant. A mature stalk is typically composed of 11–16% fiber, 12–16% soluble sugars, 2–3% non-sugars, and 63–73% water. This is also the main source of sugar that we use everyday, and can be converted into molasses which some animals like, such as rabbit. This sugar cane molasses can boost the appetite of this cute mammal called rabbit.

Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a small mammal that is herbivore, some makes them as pets (Domestic rabbits), and can be a great source of income too. We will make them a food from dried water hyacinth leaves and compare what is its improvement in many aspects like in health and etc. from the original food that it eats.

Since water hyacinth and sugarcane are pretty much available in the local area, together with the rabbit that can be bought in almost all of the pet stores located in the local area. Also, because of the alarming conditions of the environment (water hyacinths causing flashfloods), dried water hyacinth leaves mixed with sugarcane molasses are chosen to be as feed for the rabbit for healthier and cheapest way to feed your rabbit. Statement of the Problem

This science investigatory project aimed to use dried water hyacinth leaves mixed with sugarcane molasses as feed for the rabbit.
Specifically, this aimed to answer the following questions: 1. What the processes of:
2.1 Making the feed?
2.2 Making the sugarcane molasses?
2. What are the chemical components of the ingredients used? Like the leaves and the sugarcane molasses? 3. Will dried water hyacinth leaves mixed sugarcane molasses be a possible feed for rabbit? And will the rabbit eat the feed? 4. What are the improvements of the rabbit in the following terms? 5.3 Health

5.4 Growth
5.5 Behavior
5. If this with be sold in the market, what will be the price of this product? Hypothesis
Null: Dried water hyacinth leaves mixed with sugarcane molasses is not an ideal feed for the rabbit.
Alternative: Dried water hyacinth leaves mixed with sugarcane molasses is an ideal feed for the rabbit. Significance of the Study
Water hyacinths are almost can be found in all rivers, ponds, and lakes: which makes them very abundant here in the Philippines, they causes such disaster like flashfloods and destroy the properties located near it, they block the way that the water will flow: And the sugarcane is can be bought or harvested in the local area. Drying the leaves of the water hyacinth and mixing it with sugarcane molasses, a new innovation in rabbit food production will be more conductive to the welfare of the environment than they are the cause of deaths of...
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