Water Crisis

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Every day, the sun rises, and each night the sun sets. Ripples of the ocean turn into waves, rolling in and back out into the vast sea. Trees grow, creating crisp air to replenish aching lungs, and life, both human and beast, continue on throughout time. Mankind knows that the sun will rise. People are dependent on the rising and setting of this huge, flaming star; but with pollution, littering, and soaking up all of the natural resources, the world will cease to turn. In that event, can anyone still depend on the sun to rise? Imagine a world in which there was a shortage of water. Although lakes, oceans, rivers, and bays are natural resources, they are not everlasting. This world would become dry and cracked. Trees wouldn’t be able to grow; therefor oxygen would become scarce and rare. Imagine this horrifying land where eventually, the world runs out of water. That is the world we live in today. The scary part is, not everyone knows about it. According to http://www.concernusa.org, a website dedicated to the current water crises, “A child dies every 15 seconds from diseases caused by a lack of safe water and sanitation. Every year 1.5 million children dye from preventable diseases such as diarrhea, cholera and typhoid.” As the author’s illustrated, all of these diseases are due to unclean water. Blue Gold: World Water Wars is an intellectual documentary about the sanitation of water. As stated in this film, “Today, one in eight people still do not have access to safe drinking water and more than half of the diseases in the world are caused by unclean H2O.” The speaker claims that one out of every eight people will be diagnosed with a preventable disease because of the water crises. The video demonstrates that the cause of unsafe water is a direct result of humans mistreating natural resources. Oil spills, toxic fumes, and smoke billowing out of mills have contributed to infecting the sources of water. Richer nations such as the U.S use an insane amount of...
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