Water, and Overlooked Essential Nutrient

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Water|
An Overlooked Nutrient|
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Lena Lockhart|
10/2/2011|

Health Wellness and Nutrition

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"Water: An Overlooked Essential Nutrient."
My name is Lena Lockhart, and I have been asked to present arguments for your firm on the differences between water, and sports drinks Gatorade and PowerAde. I have found some interesting information, and this paper will present my findings. I am sure that this will be an informative look at the various ways of hydrating your body and help you to make a decision on what is best for you at any particular moment. Water

Daily Recommendations
It is recommended that an adult drink eight to ten eight-ounce glasses of water a day. Athletes and active teens should drink at least ten to twelve glasses of water daily. However, many foods and beverages contain water, which can make up part of this daily intake. Fresh fruits and vegetables, cooked vegetables, canned and frozen fruits, soups, stews, juices, and milk are all sources of water. Most fruits and vegetables contain up to 90 percent water, while meats and cheeses contain at least 50 percent. (http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Smi-Z/Water.html#ixzz1Zf5TnTk9)

Nutrient content and benefits of consuming water
The nutrients sometimes found in drinking water at potentially significant levels of particular interest are: • Calcium – important in bone health and possibly cardiovascular health • Magnesium – important in bone and cardiovascular health • Fluoride – effective in preventing dental caries

• Sodium – an important extracellular electrolyte, lost under conditions of excess sweat • Copper – important in antioxidant function, iron utilization and cardiovascular health • Selenium – important in general antioxidant function and in the immune system • Potassium is important for a variety of biochemical effects but it is usually not found in natural drinking waters at significant levels. (http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/nutrientschap1.pdf) According to registered dietician Mitzi Dulan, in her article at NutritionExpert.com, water should always be your first choice for re-hydrating after a workout, unless you're working out for more than an hour or exercising in particularly harsh conditions (e.g., cycling uphill in high heat and humidity). http://www.livestrong.com/article/176398-powerade-vs-gatorade/#ixzz1ZfZW0KxJ

Disadvantages of drinking water and safety levels
Studies were conducted in several different countries around the world, from the years 1979 to 2003, to address the disadvantages of water. Higher content of Calcium and Magnesium can cause several different illnesses as shown in this illustration of the breakdown of water and chronic diseases.

Fluoride is also something that is found in drinking water, in varying degrees, and can be linked to crippling skeletal fluorosis which is almost always associated with high fluoride intake from drinking water. This is a significant irreversible health problem in parts of India, China and Africa, for example. Ingestion of excess fluoride during tooth development, particularly at the maturation stage, may also result in dental fluorosis; these effects may also be mitigated by co-exposure to some minerals such as calcium or magnesium. Cost

Water can be a very inexpensive beverage, in financial ways, because in most countries there is a plentiful supply, piped directly into the homes of people. In 3rd world countries, however, the cost of water can be very high, because these countries are not equipped to clean and filter the water for the residents of the country. Stabilization of demineralized and corrosive drinking water should be done where possible with additives that will increase or reestablish calcium and magnesium levels. The general public and health professionals should have access to information on the composition of community supplies...
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