Wasps Nest Commentary

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The Wasp’s Nest

The Wasp’s Nest by James L Rosenberg describes the struggle of power between the poet and the two birds that are building their nest. The poet uses the wasps and their nest as a symbol to show reality of the humans. Finally, at the end the poet realizes that his life too is like that of the wasps and thus starts to sympathize with them. The poet structures the poem in such a way to show the struggle of power between the wasps and the humans and ends with a climax. The choice of words and literary techniques such as onomatopoeia, imagery and metaphors are used to portray the power struggle between the two creatures. The poet uses some rhythmic tones such as “stranger” “danger”, “hum” “come” in order to give a smooth flow to the poem. However the use of punctuations is very limited. They are mostly used when there is a change in ideas or to emphasize on a certain point. For instance, when describing the birds he says, they “resonantly, savagely a-hum, have lately come”. Here one notices the stress that the punctuations are creating on the strength of the birds. At the commencement of the poem, the poet highlights the strength of the wasps. Using a metaphor he describes them as “two aerial tigers”, by comparing them to a tiger one gets the impression that they are strong and ferocious. Moreover using imagery he says that they are “stripped in ebony and gold”. This makes the reader feel the importance that the poet has made upon the wasps. By using color like gold and ebony instead of black and yellow, we see that the poet gives them a sort of richness. Just as how one would treasure those metals, the same way the poet treasures the wasps because he can connect his life to theirs. He then uses onomatopoeia to describe the sound that the wasps make “resonantly” and “savagely”. This stress on their strength that they are trying to lay upon in the world. However in the next few lines the poet tries to...
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