Was the Great Depression to Blame for the Success of the Nazi Party?

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Was the Great Depression To Blame For The Success Of The Nazi Party?

In the following essay I will discuss both the reasons for and against the great depression being to blame for the success of the Nazi Party. I will also use a range of statistics and factual evidence to support these reasons, before finally coming to a conclusion where I will give a clear judgement including my personal opinion on whether it was to blame.

Firstly, the great depression caused massive unemployment in Germany, over 6 million people were unemployed by 1933. This was great for the Nazi’s, because put simply, when people are happy and rich they do not turn to extremist parties, however when they are unemployed and poor, they do. There is a graph that shows the direct correlation between unemployed rates and Nazi party supporters. As more people became unemployed, the Nazi’s got more votes. Between 1928 and 1930, Nazi votes had increased from 800,000 to 6,409,000, which links with the fact that also between these years, unemployment went from about 1 Million to about 3 Million people. Also, the Nazi’s supported Anti-Jewish views, this appealed to people more during unemployment because a lot of Jewish people had jobs that Germans believed should be given to them.

Secondly, the great depression also caused massive poverty and economic problems. USA stopped giving money to Germany and suddenly wanted all debts paid back; Germany couldn’t afford this, doubt the reparations in the Versailles treaty. By 1931, Germany’s biggest bank collapsed, which made paying back debts even more difficult, and thus a combination of these factors led to another hyperinflation. This led to lack of support and eventually the collapse of the Weimar Republic, making the Nazi’s more popular as they promised a strong Germany with strong leadership as there was in the “Good days under the Kaiser.”

However, despite all this evidence for the great depression being the blame for the rise of the...
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