Warren Court

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Between 1953 and 1969, Earl Warren was the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Supreme Court decisions made during the "Warren Court" time period led to significant changes in different aspects of life in the United States. The Warren Court affected public schools, separation of church and state, and the rights of individuals accused of crime. The Warren Court affected public schools. The Brown v. Board of Education had a big part in the Warren Court. They decided to ban segregation in public schools. Therefore, more black children attended white schools. However, the Brown v. Board of Education decision did not abolish segregation in other public areas, such as restaurants and restrooms. The Warren Court affected prayer in public schools. Engel v. Vitale decision states that prayer is no longer allowed in public schools. John F Kennedy suggested a "remedy" to people who disagree with Engel vs. Vitale. He says to pray more at home and not in school. However, prayer in public schools continued. Prayers are part of school activities from early morning moments of silence to lunchtime prayer sessions. The issue in this continuing debate is that people wanted to continue fighting religion in school. Lastly, the Miranda decision affected American society. It has increased public awareness of constitutional rights. More people now know their rights and what they are entitled to. Someone accused of a crime be informed of his or her constitutional rights prior to interrogation. This protected the rights of the accused. Therefore, the Warren Court greatly affected American society. The Warren Court affected public schools and desegregation, prayer in public schools and the rights of individuals accused of crime.
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