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I wanna be yours by John Cooper Clarke

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I wanna be yours by John Cooper Clarke

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The title is the first sign of a "rule breaking" poem, the lower case letters. This poem has no deep meaning but only one of deep desire for some-one. It is quite a childish poem as it uses only very simple words, is ungrammatical and uses childish rhymes. It also does not use grammatically correct words such as "wanna". It is very informal, like what someone would say in a serenade to a person.

This poem has a very strong central message with very little deep meaning. The central message is desire and about the amount of will people can have to love one and another. This comes across very strongly because not many people would be willing to become household items for just anyone, they would have to care for that person very deeply.

The tone of this poem could go either way. The poem sounds very happy because it has a very strong rhythmic beat, almost like a song. However if read closely seems very sad because the speaker cares for this person so strongly and their love does not seem to feel the same. It is a poem of true desperation.

The feeling in this poem stays the same all the way through because it is a very repetitive poem. This poem makes you think about how loving someone so much that it hurts.

The imagery you get when reading this poem is that it is a man speaking as he talks about doing household chores:- "...vacuum cleaner". Which you wouldn't be worth writing about if it was a woman talking because the chores don't affect men. The image conjured in my mind when reading this mean is from the 1950's:- "electric heater". This would not be applicable now because we have central heating and so would not need an electric heater. I personally visualise women with perfect hair like in 'Stepford Wives' and men with top hats and golf umbrellas singing in the rain (but not using the umbrellas).

There is no punctuation in sight in this poem. All the lines start with lower case letters and there are no full-stops or commas to break up the poem....