Walmart Good or Bad?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 179
  • Published : May 14, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Wal-Mart was the world’s largest retailer, with 220 billion dollars in sales and the nation’s largest private employer, with 3,372 stores, more than 1 million hourly workers, and accounted for 2 percent of America’s domestic product. (Olsson) Just like many other large companies, Wal-Mart has its’ light and dark side. The company receives much criticism from Karen Olsson’s article “Up Against Wal-Mart” on the way they handle their employees and their methods of success around the world. Things such as suppression of wages, overtime without pay, union busters, and bad health care. However, in its own defense, Wal-Mart believes that they are like every other company and simply trying to be successful. Though their methods may seem harsh, Wal-Mart believes what they are doing is necessary. In other words, they are a “necessary evil”. They may feel this way, but I agree with Olsson and the employees that try to expose Wal-Mart for their monopoly type ways. In Sebastian Mallaby’s article, he states that a leading critic against Wal-Mart calculated a 4.7 billion dollar annual loss of wages for workers. (Par.4) In his counter argument, mallaby tries to say that the suppression of wages could go either way. Depending on where Wal-Mart opened a store the need for jobs could be high or low. Like in Glendale, Arizona, Wal-Mart acquired 8,000 applications for only 525 jobs.(Par.4) So yes in some cases “the victims” in certain regions may be “better off”.(Par. 5) In Karen Olsson’s article “Up Against Wal-Mart”, she refers to the daily life of a current female employee of Wal-Mart. Jennifer McLaughlin describes her work days and “fast paced” and “frenetic”.(Par.1) After three years of working, she only receives 16,000 dollars a year and is considered high-paid. She has no health insurance and relies on Medicaid for her son simply because of the fact she does not get paid enough and cannot afford it. (Olsson) Just like thousands of other employees, Jennifer McLaughlin has to...
tracking img