Wal-Mart Sex Discrimination

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RUNNIG HEADER: WAL-MART SEX DICRIMINATION

Wal-Mart Sex Discrimination: Dukes vs. Wal-Mart Inc.

MAN3240 Organizational Behavior

Table of Contents
Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………….. Pg 3 Wal-Mart Sex Discrimination: Dukes Vs. Wal-Mart Inc…………………………………….. Pg 4 History of Walmart…………………………………………………………………………… Pg 4 Sex Discrimination…………………………………………………………………………… Pg 5 Dukes vs. Wal-Mart Inc……………………………………………………………………… Pg 5 Wal-Mart is labeled as “Cheap”……………………………………………………………… Pg 7 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………. Pg 8 Reference……………………………………………………………………………………... Pg 9 Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………….. Pg 10

Abstract
“Always low prices,” is the clever motto used by Wal-Mart to lure its customers into the supermarket. Wal-Mart serves customers and members more than 200 million times per week. They operate under 69 different banners in 27 countries (Frank, 2006). With fiscal year 2012 sales of approximately $444 billion, Wal-Mart employs 2.2 million associates worldwide. Wal-Mart has created a façade declaring that their low prices have benefited all Americans. However, under its disguise of generosity, Wal-Mart has become an unethical workplace from which the workers, the society, and Americans are suffering.

Wal-Mart Sex Discrimination: Dukes vs. Wal-Mart Inc.
History of Walmart
In the late 1940’s, Sam Walton had a simple but momentous idea. Walton was always looking for deals from suppliers. He realized he could do better than other retailers by passing on the savings to his customers and earning his profits through volume (Frank, 2006). This formed a cornerstone of Walton’s business strategy when he launched Wal-Mart in 1962. The decade that began from the 1970s was period of substantial economic growth, in the history of Wal-Mart. In 1971, it started off a huge expansion by opening a gigantic center and also a home office in Bentonville, Arkansas (“Sam Walton”). The 70s decade saw a substantial rise in the number of employees which amounted to about 1500 associates. 1975 the company had expanded to 7500 associated and had 125 operational stores. In 1977, in a massive takeover, Wal-Mart acquired the Hutcheson Shoe Company and also introduced a branch for pharmaceuticals by the name Wal-Mart pharmacy. By the end of the decade, Wal-Mart had become a giant in the American retail industry with a turnover of more than 1.248 billion dollars in sales and 276 stores managed massive yet efficient staff of 21, 000 associates. When Walton died in 1992, the adjustment to a post-Sam environment proved difficult (“Sam Walton”). Although Wal-Mart executives had emphasized for years that their company depended on a set of principles and habits more than it did on any one person, Walton's death wound up marking a fateful shift in how the company was perceived. Before his death, Walton witnessed the rise of Wal-Mart becoming the biggest corporation of this nation and the world. However, he was unable to see the steady path of its destruction. Throughout its path to success, Wal-Mart has turned into a selfish vendor who has forgotten morals, ethics, and mainly America (Frank, 2006). However, the dependency of customers on Wal-Mart is so high that it is impossible to challenge their ways. Walton’s Wal-Mart has turned into dominating supermarket by crushing the rights of their employees, by destroying the jobs of many Americans, and by changing of the quality of life in the American societies. Sex Discrimination

According to our book, surface-level diversity is the observable demographic and other overt differences in people, such as their race, ethnicity, gender, age, and physical capabilities (McShane & Von Glinow, 2011, p.21). Sex discrimination is part of surface- level diversity. Discrimination usually occurs when actions of an employer, supervisor or coworkers "deny to individuals or groups of people equality of treatment which they may wish."( Stainback, Ratliff, & Roscigno, 2011)...
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