Waiting for Godot

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The play ‘Waiting for Godot’ written by Samuel Beckett is honestly one of the most peculiar and confusing pieces of literature I have ever laid my eyes upon. Although my experience with English literature is rather small therefore I cannot speak for everyone when I say this. I still find it hard to comprehend sometimes and not because of the language but by the acts of the characters and certain scenes within the play itself. The play itself is shrouded with ambiguity that Samuel Beckett ingeniously crafted to be filled with simple but meaningful symbols and archetypes as to challenge the reader or observer to decipher and come up with their own conclusion.

The first symbol that we see early in the play is the tree. In Act I, we see an old dying tree that has no leaves and is just rooted there waiting to fall over. The dead tree gives off a gloomy and sorrowful setting that resonates throughout act I. Even the bog that Vladimir and Estragon are in does no good in brightening up the mood of the play. They talk about the tree and argue on whether it’s a shrub or a real tree then start contemplating on whether they are waiting at the right location for Godot but somehow they were able to somewhat convince themselves that they were in the right place. Therefore the tree in act I act as some sort of reminder for Vladimir and Estragon that they are waiting for someone. The tree in my opinion also symbolizes how erratic and fragile life is, because the tree alters itself to cope with the different seasons until it dies, cursed to live in the same circle forever. This somehow correlates to Estragon and Vladimir as to how they are also stuck in the same place and waiting for godot while they go by unnoticed. In act II, we see the tree full of leaves signifying a change in time that unfortunately show how long Vladimir and Estragon have been waiting for godot as time passes around them.

Another archetype in the play is the road. The road as we commonly know links one...
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