Voip Suitability Analysis

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VoIP Suitability Analysis
IP Telephony/VoIP
Keller School of Management - Devry University
NETW590
Professor Reddy Urimindi

Table of Contents

Executive Summary3
Introduction3
Evolution of IP Telephony – Mobile/Physical Applications4 Hardware Capabilities5
Intrusion/Denial of Service (DoS)5
Analyses6
Hardware/Customer Purchased Equipment (CPE) Analysis6
Intrusion/Denial-of-Service (DoS) Analysis9
Recommended Solution and Implementation11
Hardware/Intrusion/DoS Resolution Steps:11
Cost of Implementation13
Risk Assessment13
References16

Executive Summary
Introduction
In the evolving trend of telephony technology, the time of circuit-switched packet-switched telephone network (PSTN) is now the backbone for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). Service providers are in the midst of a gradual evolution from circuit-switched to IP-based packet-switched infrastructures. IP is attractive for two main reasons: cost savings and revenue. Carriers expect operational and infrastructure savings from deploying new IP-based services because they believe that implementing applications on IP networks will be much less expensive than running them on circuit-switched networks. In addition, every carrier is looking for new ways to enhance its service suites, which are rapidly becoming commodities. The evolution to IP-based infrastructures means more shared networks. Because IP emphasizes logical over physical connections, IP makes it easier for multiple carriers to coexist on a single network. This encourages cooperative sharing of interconnected networks, structured as anything from sales of wholesale circuits to real-time capacity exchanges. It also means increased competition because there are reduced barriers to entry; new companies can enter the market without the huge fixed costs associated with traditional network models. Carriers are ultimately focusing on VoIP suitability in transitioning to VoIP telephony both mobile and immobile. Such wireless standards as GSM, 3G, LTE, WiMAX, and WiFi assessments of cost benefits, accessibility, hardware support and speed are key in determining the customer application requirements. From my experience, the military utilizes VoIP telephony via DSL in combat and non-combat environments where PSTN resources are unavailable. While on a deployment to Iraq in 2010, VoIP was a primary means of communicating from one location to another. Such capabilities were available due to the very small aperture technology (VSAT). Without VSAT, we would revert back to communicating over radio waves. Some VoIP issues that arose varied on the location, environmental conditions, weather, etc. Mainly, the ability to access a DSL network was key. The networks had many limitations that affected VoIP. Some of which are overloading, limited bandwidth during peak usage times, hardware capabilities, security from intrusion/denial-of-service attacks, power source locations, etc. In all, VoIP has requirements that are available in the United States that were not available in Iraq.

Evolution of IP Telephony – Mobile/Physical Applications
Juniper Research predicts that the total number of mobile VoIP minutes will jump from 15 billion minutes in 2010 to 470.6 billion minutes by 2015. In the United States alone, a projected 135 billion mobile VoIP minutes will be used by 2015. And a user increase of mobile VoIP applications and services of one billion is estimated by about 2017. This means mobile devices and network infrastructures must be scalable and robust to accommodate the growth in mobile VoIP usage, applications and services. In specific, hardware capabilities and intrusion/denial-of-service (DoS) are key problems that must be addressed. This conveys a reasoning to analyze the suitability of VoIP in its capacity. Hardware Capabilities...
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