Violent Video Games and Their Influence on Young Minds

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Video Game Violence and Its Effect on the Common Man
Video games are basically known as a staple among American teenagers. Many teenage boys and even some girls spend hours of their day staring at the TV screen and rapidly pushing buttons on a controller. Many of the top selling games in America strongly involve violence in their gameplay. These types of games raise many questions about how they affect the people playing the games. Are there negative consequences or are these claims just made up? There is research to back up both claims but the negative effects of violent video games seem to overpower the positives of recreational violent video game play. Manufacturers should enforce their own policy towards people who play their games in a more efficient way. Video games have multiple severe problems associated with the violence that is so heavily incorporated into them. Video games can give a false sense of reality and allow gamers to become so immersed into their game play that lines between real life situations and game play situations begin to blend together. Playing video games can also become an addictive distraction. Many avid gamers can spend hours at a time glued to their TVs playing on their Xboxes, PS3s, and other gaming consoles. This time spent playing games can take away from other activities. Important things like schoolwork and grades can be affected by spending all one’s time playing games instead of focusing on more important things. It can cause people that play the games to go to sleep super late in the night. The students then have to wake up early and go to school tired and will not be able to focus and stay awake to learn the material being taught. Video games also spur a sedimentary lifestyle. Obviously, not getting enough daily exercise leads to weight gain and other health issues. Violent video games also cause behavioral and social problems. These games desensitize people towards killing and steer them in the direction that killing is okay. It also teaches people that violence is the proper to solution to problems.

When people blur reality with fantasy problems begin to occur, people start to behave in reality how they would in their simulation games or they could completely forget about reality and become completely immersed in their fantasy life on their game consoles. Playing virtual video games can change the way a person views the world. It can warp what they think should happen in the world to change it into what they want to happen in terms of their virtual reality experienced in game play. Video games have become more popular now than they have ever been before. Also, all of the technological advances have allowed game makers to make graphics and game content much more realistic. Now gamers can feel as if they’re in the very front of the battlefield shooting away at enemies and feel the grenades blowing up next to them. It has to be impossible for these types of violent games to not effect the person playing them. Especially when hours on end are spent absorbed in a virtual world. One-way people can merge their game lives and real lives together is to see fictional characters as actual people to admire and take after. Craig Anderson explains in his article “Violent Video Games and Other Media Violence,” that observational learning is normally associated with real life figures. Observational behavior is behavior that people observe normally from an authority figure such as a parent or teacher. People then deem the behavior as a socially acceptable and moral way to behave in daily life. Now it is being found that people can also do this with fictional film characters. Children that play violent games starting at a young age have a higher chance of idolizing these characters. It is easier to idolize them because they grow up watching their behavior and also controlling their behavior in the game. Jane McGonigal, a director of game research and development at the Institute for the...
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