Violent Crimes

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Hate crimes and Violence in Schools|
Maggie Gallegos Criminology| 9/1/2011|

Brookline College



Hate crimes are “any felony or violent crime based on prejudice against a particular group. They are prejudice’s most extreme expression. Compared to other crimes, hate crimes have a broader impact on victims and communities because they target core aspects of identity.” In this paper I will go over different types of hate crimes and what the law does to protect the rights of the victims. I will also go over Violence in the Schools and provide some helpful information to better understand what the crime is and what the law does to protect the victims. School violence, is any form of violent activity or activities inside the school premises. It includes bullying, physical abuses, verbal abuses, brawl, shooting etc. Bullying and physical abuses are the most common forms of violence that is associated with school violence. As the years gone by, the violence at school has gotten more and more frequent and in some cases, dangerous. For example Columbine High School massacre in Colorado in 1999 and how about, Virginia Tech Massacre in 2007. It’s surprising to find out that young students could go to such extremities.

Violent Crimes
When you think of violent crimes, right away murder or homicide comes to mind, however, Hate crime is the violence of intolerance and bigotry, and also considered a violent crime. Intended to hurt and intimidate someone because of their, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or religious. The source of hate use explosives, arson, weapons, vandalism, physical violence, and verbal threats of violence to instill fear in their victims, leaving them vulnerable to more attacks and feeling separated, helpless, skeptical and fearful. Some may become upset and irritated if they believe the local government will not protect them. When offenders of hate crimes are not charged or punished for the crime, it sends a sign that basically no one cares about the victim. When really that’s not the case. I just feel that maybe society wasn’t sure on how to handle and deal with the crime. In 1990, the Hate Crimes Statics Act, the federal government began to gather data about certian categories of hate crimes. Hate crimes are unlike then other violent crimes, hate crimes have an effect on both the direct target and the communities of which the individuals are a member, which makes them different from other crimes. Victims of violent hate crimes may endure from more psychological distress for example, depression, distress, stress, anxiety and anger to mention a few.

In 1997, CRS was involved in 135 hate crime cases that caused or intensified community racial and ethnic tensions. As authorized by the Civil Rights Act of 1964, CRS became involved only in those cases in which the criminal offender was motivated by the victim's race, color, or national origin. Of all hate crime incidents reported to the U.S. Department of Justice's Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in 1996, 72 percent were motivated by the victim's race, color, or national origin. ( Of all crimes, hate crimes are most likely to create or intensify tensions, which can trigger larger community-wide ethnic conflict, civil conflict, and even riots. Hate crimes put cities and towns at-risk of serious social and economic consequences. The direct costs of racial conflicts and civil disturbances are police, fire, and medical employees’ overtime, injury or death, business and residential property loss, and damage to vehicles and equipment. Hate crime actually affects the whole community. For...
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