Village Life

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Raipur Tourist Information in depth - Why come to Sirpur Raipur -Introduction: Sirpur (Lal-2l ° 25'N, Long 82° II'E) in district Mahasamund of Chattisgarh state, India, a small village on the right bank of Mahanadi was once a large town of considerable importance. In fifth-eigth centuries A.D. Sirpur was the capital of Sarabhapuriyas and Panduvamsis of South Kosla. It's ancient name was 'Sripura'. As it contained a great number of dwelling houses, for all classes, king's palace, numerous temples and was situated in a forested country it was called 'pura', i.e.Sripura. The position of Sirpur is at the top of all international famed historical places of South Kosal ie, present Chhattisgarh. Sirpur, located at the bank of Mahanadi river. Urban development and city planning which developed during Harappan Period, the example of which are great cities like Mohenjodaro, Harappa, Lothal, Kalibangan, Rupar, Dholavira, etc., survived during Early Historical period and later on in Dakshin Kosala (Chhattisgarh), the outstanding examples of which are Sirpur, Malhar, Ratanpur etc. Out of these, so far, only Sirpur has been excavated on a large scale, giving a glimpse of city planning and architecture. Somavamshi king Nannadeva's son Teevardeva (grand son of Indrabal) captured Dakshin Kosala after defeaing Sarbhapuriya king Mahapravar-raj as at this time we get Teevardeva's inscription from Sirpur and adjoining areas, in which Teevardeva has been described as ruler of entire Kosala (middle of 6th century A.D.). At this time Sirpur was at its Golden Era and reached the peak of glory. It is during this period that art, architecture, iconography and literature freely grew and Sirpur's . fame spread to far off places. Probably it is due to this fame, Chinese traveller Huen- T'sang visited Sirpur in 639 A.D. He wrote that the inhabitants were tall, dark and prosperous. The king was Kshatriya and very benevolent. He discovered here as many as hundred Buddhist monasteries, inhabited by about-lOOO monks, belonging to the Mahayana sect, and more than 150 temples. The Buddhist association of Sirpur, suspected as early" as 1881-82 by Cunnigham on the basis of the find of colossal head of Buddha and partly confirmed by the discovery of a complete inscribed image of Buddha in the first decade of the twentieth century and latest discovery of bronze images was borne out by the 'unearthing of two monasteries. Mahasivagupta Balarjuna's Lakshman temple stone inscription says that his father Harshagupta was married to Suryavarma's daughter Vasata. Suryavarma was the son ofIshanvarma (551 A.D.) Village: Most of India's people live in villages. Most villagers are  farmers who work in nearby fields. A typical Indian village is a collection of mud-and-straw dwellings. These homes are generally small, consisting of one or two rooms with mud floors. Wealthier families live in brick or concrete houses. Most villagers own few possessions. These belongings typically include brass pots for cooking and clay pots for carrying water and storing grain. Village people cook foods on a chula, a clay oven that burns coal. People sit and sleep on cots of woven string, which are dragged outside on warm days. Many people also sleep outside. If the village is without electric power, kerosene lanterns are used for light. A local well or nearby pond or river provides water for most villages. Some larger villages have running water. A council of elected elders, called a panchayat, governs most villages. The panchayat has the power to hear complaints and administer punishments. Village in India - Unity and Divisiveness

| Villagers in India manifest a deep loyalty to their village, identifying themselves to strangers as residents of a particular village, harking back to family residence in the village that typically extends into the distant past. A family rooted in a particular village does not easily move to another, and even people who have lived in a city for a...
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