Videogames Persuasive Speech

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In today’s society the entertainment industry is being attacked from many angles. Television is being criticized by showing images of violence and aggression, music is being ridiculed for explicit lyrics, and within the last decade the issue of videogame violence and children has come to the attention of the mass media. The media, politicians, and many parents are blaming videogames for violent acts among children and those less than 18 years of age. But could videogames be the sole cause of violent crimes among children? In the fall of 2005 I took a course here at Coker called Videogames – Analysis and Research. The most popular topic discussed in our class was Violence and Aggression as a result of Violent Videogames. We studied research conducted by many studies concluding that violent videogames is not a direct cause in aggressive youth behavior. Surprisingly it is actually the opposite. Many children feel that videogames is an outlet for their stress and angry emotions. Cheryl K. Olson, ScD, Lawrence Kutner, PhD, and Eugene V. Beresin, MD have done research on this topic and published it in the Psychiatric Times. They presented children and adolescents with a list of 17 possible reasons for playing video games. More than half cited creative reasons for play, such as "I like to learn new things" and "I like to create my own world." "To relax" was chosen as a reason to play by the majority of boys and close to half of girls. "To get my anger out" was selected by 45% of boys and 29% of girls; 25% of boys and 11% of girls said that they played to "cope with anger." Violent video games might provide a safe outlet for aggressive and angry feelings. This use of video games to manage emotions came up repeatedly in focus groups they conducted with 42 young adolescent boys. A typical comment was, "If I had a bad day at school, I'll play a violent video game, and it just relieves all my stress." They found that Children also play violent electronic games for predictable developmental reasons, such as rebellion, curiosity about the forbidden, and testing the limits of acceptable behavior in a safe environment. "You get to see something that hopefully will never happen to you," said one boy of their focus groups. "So you want to experience it a little bit without actually being there." In both surveys and focus groups, boys described video game play as a social activity. Although most boys played games alone at times, most also routinely played with one or more friends. Just 18% of boys and 12% of girls surveyed said they always played alone. Those statistics also debunk the idea that videogames are for adolescents that are socially neglected. That videogames are played by children that have no social life. Videogames are most often played with friends and in large groups. In computer gaming such games as World of Warcraft connect you to thousands of people around the world, to chat and form alliances with. It is also possible that videogames receive so much scrutiny because video games are more realistic than ever before. Realism in video games is at an all-time high. It's absolutely astounding to think that only 20 years ago, we were amazed by the colors in Tetris or the sharp animations of popular Nintendo Entertainment System titles like the original Super Mario Bros. Times have changed considerably. In today’s gaming world, one can see blood and gore like never seen in gaming before. Some sources say this desensitizes children. Even though most scenes of violence in videogames do not even come close to the acts of violence children can witness by merely flipping on their television. In my opinoin adults do not give children enough credit in realizing the difference between reality and virtual reality. If the child does not understand this differece who is really to blame? Videogames or the parents?I have absolute proof that video games are not the cause of this supposed epidemic of youth violence in...
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