Video Game Violence

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Video Game Pop Culture Misunderstanding

Our society isn't safe for our children anymore because of drugs and alcohol abuse, sex, violence, war, playing video games…Playing video games? This is the last straw; some video games are made the focus of controversy when much better things can be argued over. Well, don't get me wrong, some of these games show horrific acts of and much less to our kids. Also in 1992 "A recent survey found that 92 percent of U.S. kids--ages 2 to 17--play video games, and their parents bought 225 million of them last year to the tune of $6.4 billion." (Sider 79).What's here to argue is that violent video games do not cause violence among children, but the blame for violence should be on the individual and people who should have taught the individual better. If kids are not able to see the difference between reality and fantasy, then they really can't be blamed for committing acts they see in a game and then imitating, not fully understanding the consequences of doing it in the real world. Parents should be the overall deciders of what they want their children playing, watching, and doing. Being left with the right to raise their child in their fashion, parents should find out what the child is playing and limit or restrict them, so then parents can't blame anything on video games if their kid commits a violent act. With video games as the new part of our pop culture, many adults find it hard to understand why children would want to spend so much time playing with these "idiot boxes". With this lack of understanding comes fear, for, as humans, we fear what we do not know. So all that will come of this cycle is people will continue to play video games, something new in our pop culture will come and replace video games, and it will be radical for our pop culture and taken on as the root of all evil due to lack of understanding.

With the high rise in violent video games in the last few years, adults see certain acts of violence portrayed in some video games to be a cause of violent acts committed by kids. This is such an easy decision to make, lay blame on something that is new, something radical like violent video games. People don't even take a look back and remember "Novels, films, radio, and television have all been accused of leading young people astray and inducing violent or antisocial behavior. The fuss about video games may be just another case of curmudgeons complaining" (Walling 1436). If they saw these then they would see a pattern and might not think of pop-culture as harshly. Unfortunately many people do not, and then they blame it on everything but themselves. These arguments are fueled by certain acts of violence; one main support is the Columbine schools shooting where the two kids had been avid players of the video game DOOM (a first-person shooter where you go through levels killing monsters). People hear these arguments, but what they don't hear is that Harris and Klebold had many personal problems, such as being harassed at school, neglected by parents, and family problems. These problems could have easily given them a warped view on fantasy and reality, and are usually completely overlooked by many people. This example and many more are the fuel for such organizations as MAVAV (Mothers Against Videogame Addiction and Violence), "While video game companies continue to market violence aimed at vulnerable children and young teens. And the newest absurdity, underground video game cultures which takes gaming to another level, tainted with online "clans", singling out of people, hatred, racism, and sexism." These groups seek a more governmental control of video games. "Video games are the topic on the surface… a convenient scapegoat for people who do not want to probe deeper into the problem of where the "ambition to kill" come from." (Zarozinski). It's easy to read something in the news and take in only what they tell you, but before you go forming extreme views on this subject...
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