Versailles, Hampton Court Palace, and St. Peter's Basilica

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  • Topic: Rome, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Baroque
  • Pages : 3 (1066 words )
  • Download(s) : 532
  • Published : July 16, 2012
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Carma Todd
June 21, 2012
HUMN 2223
Shirley Elliott
I took a virtual tour of Versailles, Hampton Court Palace, and St. Peter's Basilica as well as looked at numerous pictures of artwork and architecture in and of the buildings. These three places have things in common as well as many differences. They all have the evidence of the baroque era but they each show different values that are most important to their community. It seems to me that Versailles was more concerned with showing their successes in politics, economics and the arts. Hampton court palace seemed more concerned with showing power than anything else. Finally, at St. Peter's Basilica the artwork and architecture seems to show their concern and devotion to their religion.

The first place I would like to discuss is Versailles. Some of the rooms here are named after planets such as The Venus Salon. On the ceiling of this room Venus is illustrated with the appearance of the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite. The other art on the arches are there to show respect to ancient heroes; this included those of Louis XIV. Aside from the art in this room, the architecture is baroque as well. There is not a single part of this room that does not have some type of decoration. It is said that the Venus Salon represents the most baroque decor mostly due to the fact that this is "the only place where Le Brun made a dialogue between architecture, sculptures and paintings."( "Explore the Estate The Palace.")

Another room in Versailles that truly expresses France's pride in their successes in politics, arts, and their progressing economy is The Hall of Mirrors. There are thirty different paintings done in the arched ceiling of the hall, all of them done by Le Brun. Each of the paintings display the political advancements of Louis XIV. At this time mirrors were an expensive indulgence that the French had newly begun to manufacture. This hall contains three hundred and fifty-seven mirrors on the...
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