venus

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 VENUS

Done By: Michelow Thompson
Grade: 6
Teacher:
School: Alvernia Prep School
Due Date: Tuesday, September 9, 2014
Table of contents

Tittle Page Acknowledgement ………………………………………………………………… 3 The geography of venues …………………………………………………… 4-5 The position of Venus in the Solar System…………………………. 6-7

Acknowledgment

I would first like to express thanks to God for his divine help and leadership for all things concerning this school project. I also would like to thank my colleagues who have helped me with discussions which aided me to have a deeper understanding of this project. Moreover, I would like to thank my parents for providing me with the necessary tools needed to complete this project.

The Geography of Venus

Venus is the second planet from the sun, it has no natural satellite. It is named after the Roman Goddess of love and beauty. After the moon, it is the brightest natural object in the night sky, reaching an apparent magnitude of 4.6, bright enough to cast shadows. Because Venus is an inferior planet from Earth, it never appears to venture far from the Sun.

Venus is a terrestrial planet and is sometimes called Earth's "sister planet" because of their similar size, gravity, and bulk composition (Venus is both the closest planet to Earth and the planet closest in size to Earth). However, it has also been shown to be very different from Earth in other respectful areas. Venus is by far the hottest planet in the Solar System. It has no carbon cycle to lock carbon back into rocks and surface features, nor does it seem to have any organic life to absorb it in biomass. Venus is shrouded by an opaque layer of highly reflective clouds of sulphuric acid, preventing its surface from being seen from space in visible light, Venus's surface is a dry deserts cape interspersed with slab-like rocks and periodically refreshed by volcanism.

Venus Position in the Solar System

Venus is always brighter than any star (apart from the Sun), Venus was known to ancient civilizations both as the "morning star" and as the "evening star". It is ironic that Venus is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty, Venus is one of the harshest planets in the Solar System. It's over 460 degrees Celsius.

Venus is always brighter than the brightest stars outside our solar system, as can be seen below over the Pacific Ocean.

Modern telescopic view below of Venus from Earth's surface.
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