Ventricular Septal Defect

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Cardiology, Heart, Congenital heart disease
  • Pages : 3 (907 words )
  • Download(s) : 170
  • Published : November 11, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Ventricular Septal Defect

Ashley Shutz


Ventricular Septal Defect or VSD is commonly called the “hole in the heart.” It is a defect in the septum between the two ventricles of the left and right. It is more common in newborn babies. It is less obvious in older children and adults, because it usually closes on its own without any surgery or help. VSD is the most common type of heart defect; it can also be accompanied by other heart defects or alone. Before a child is born the right and left ventricles are not separated, as the fetus grows the wall begins to form and if it does not then that is when Ventricular Septal Defect is formed. The child usually has no symptoms, but if the hole is too large and too much blood is pumped into the lungs this will lead to heart failure. The only telltale sign there is to a child having VSD is the bluish tint to the skin which is due to oxygen poor blood being pumped through the body, is most visible in the lips and fingernails. There is at least 1 out of every 500 babies that are born with VSD. I was one of those children born with this congenital birth defect; I became very sick and was hospitalized on and off for the first 4 years of my life. I now have a slight murmur that has to be checked every 3 years with an ultrasound of the heart. It consists of an inferior muscular and superior membranous portion and is extensively innervated with conducting cardiomyocytes.

There are a few known symptoms that have been associated with VSD, they are; a bluish tint of the skin also called cyanosis, poor eating habits, failure to gain weight, fast breathing or shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, easily tired, swelling in...
tracking img