Value-Neutrality Paper Associated with Counseling

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Running head: VALUE-NEUTRALITY PAPER

Value-Neutrality Paper Associated with Counseling
Launita D. Joseph
Grand Canyon University
November 9, 2011

Value-Neutrality Paper associated with counseling
When working in the counseling field, one must remain neutral about issues that a client is suffering from. A counselor should not criticize a client for what he or she may believe in and should make ethical decisions when dealing with his or her clients. Within this paper, one will locate personal beliefs on ethical decisions, factors that might lead a counselor to referring a client to another counselor and, what would a counselor do if a referral is not an option. As a counselor, remaining value-neutral to a client’s situation should always be practiced with ethical decision-making. A counselor should remain neutral to all issues that a client is in session for to give the client the necessary help that is needed. If a counselor expresses moral judgment to a client in regards to his or her issue, the client can become resistant to the therapy session and the counselor. A client comes to the counselor because they are looking for help not to be judged or looked at negatively (Module 3 Lecture). With the issues stated above, I would be able to have a therapy session with a client, even though I am against all of the issues. Personally, I would stay away from my own values and beliefs so that no problems will arise within our counseling relationship. An example is that if I were to use my own values in a therapeutic session with a client, it would be only to allow the client to see that I was not successful with a similar issue they are facing. Out of nine ethical-decision making models that were created for counselors, no two models were alike but had similarities. Most of the models stated for one to identify the problem, consult the ethic codes, think about the consequences of the decision, and choose what is best for the client (Remley & Herlihy,...
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