Value Chain Analysis

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INTERGRATED ESSAY: VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS
Dr. Ducharme
DDBA-8160-15
Delisa C. Fryer

Abstract
The purpose of the first week’s assignment is to analyze the value chain and the strengths and weakness of Achievability a local nonprofit in Philadelphia. I will evaluate the strengths and weakness of Achievability, using Porter’s Exhibit I business model. Afterward I will come up with a strategy and a business model for In Loving Arms Family Resource Center my future business. I will also evaluate my skills sets/ social responsibilities and consider whether to increase or decrease my involvement, and determining the strengths and weakness.

Value Chain Analysis
Creating a value chain analysis is a helpful tool for working out how you will create the greatest possible value for your business and customers (Mindtools, 2013). If you are in business for yourself you certainly want to add value to your business; no matter what your business is.

A manufacturer of pulp can easy add value to his business by turning pulp into paper for sale. A nonprofit is a much harder business to add value to. Since nonprofit means no profit, it will be harder to add value; but it is possible. If you own a nonprofit you can add services, personnel, and creativity to your nonprofit to increase value, to your business. Using a model business plan such as “Michael Porter’s five forces framework, on how to use competitive forces to shape strategy” is a useful tool to analyze the grasp on the state of competition and the underlying economics within your business (Harvard business Essentials, 2005).

Analyzing Achievability Using Porter’s Five Exhibit
First you analyze your competitors or rivals, the inside and outside of your current circle of rivals. These forces include “threats of new entrants” and bargaining power of suppliers; the bargaining power of customers”, “the threat of substitute products or...
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