Utilitarianism Facing Abortion

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Utilitarianism Facing Abortion
MBA 6277

Table of Contents
Abstraction……………………………………………………….3 Ethical Principals and Methodologies ……………………………………. 4 Utilitarism ………………………………………………. 5 Types ………………………………………………. 6 Consequences ………………………………………………. 6 Statistics ………………………………… 7 Utilitarianism vs. Kantianism ………………………………………. 11 Healthcare vs. Marketplace ………………………………… 16

Government Allocation ……………………………………….. 17
Reference List ……………………………………… 19

Abstract
In his work, Utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill states that, “happiness is desirable, and the only thing desirable, as an end; all other things being only desirable as means to that end” (Mill) and that pleasure and the absence and avoidance of pain are the only two things that area desirable as ends in themselves. John Stuart Mill used the concept of utilitarianism as the basis of his philosophy. In order to examine this concept, it must first be defined and then viewed in a way that Mill viewed it and applied to the universal behavior of humans. For Mill, utilitarianism is the driving force behind all human behavior. During his time Mill was one of the fist philosophers to suggest this concept as the driving force behind all things human, and then dare to draw a parallel between the teachings of Jesus and the concept of utilitarianism. The concept of utilitarianism is very controversial and there are many criticisms against it.

Ethical Principals and Methodologies
Principals exercised when dealing with abortion
* Principle of Beneficence
Traditionally understood as the "first principle" of morality, the dictum "do good and avoid evil" lends some moral content to this principle.
1) never deliberately kill innocent human life
2) never deliberately (directly intend) harm
3) seek the patient’s good

* Principle of the Common Good
In general, the common good consists of all the conditions of society and the goods secured by those conditions, which allow individuals to achieve human and spiritual flourishing. 1) respect for persons

2) social welfare
3) peace and security

* Principle of Informed Consent
It is the right and responsibility of every competent individual to advance his or her own welfare. This right and responsibility is exercised by freely and voluntarily consenting or refusing consent to recommended medical procedures, based on a sufficient knowledge of the benefits, burdens, and risks involved. The ability to give informed consent depends on: 1) adequate disclosure of information; 2) patient freedom of choice; 3) patient comprehension of information; and 4) patient capacity for decision-making. * Principle of Religious Freedom

All persons have a right to religious freedom, which has its foundation in human dignity. This principle implies that competent individuals should never be forced to act in a manner contrary to their religious beliefs and that they have the right to refuse participation in any treatment or procedure that is contrary to their conscience, nor should they be restrained from acting in accordance with their own beliefs, within due limits. * Principle of Respect for Autonomy

As commonly understood today, autonomy is the capacity for self-determination. The principle of respect for autonomy implies that one should be free from coercion in deciding to act, and that others are obligated to protect confidentiality, respect privacy, and tell the truth. It is acknowledging person’s right to make choices and take action based on that person’s own values and belief system. Utilitarianism

The dictionary...
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