USA Trade Unions Information Pack

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OECD CONVENTION ON COMBATING BRIBERY OF FOREIGN PUBLIC OFFICIALS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS

USA TRADE UNIONS INFORMATION PACK

- Introductory Letter

- Introducing the OECD Convention (briefing 1)

- Corruption Matters: Enron, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the OECD Convention (briefing 2)

- Information Check-list (briefing 3)

- Contact Points (briefing 4)

PSIRU, School of Computing and Mathematics
University of Greenwich, Maritime Greenwich Campus,
Old Naval College, Park Row, London, SE10 9LS
Tel/Fax: 00 44 (0) 20 8331 7781/8665
Email: corruption@psiru.org; Web: www.psiru.org/corruption

United Against Corruption: TU Support for the OECD Anti-bribery Convention

UNICORN is a global trade unions anti-corruption network, supported by TUAC (the Trade Union Advisory Committee to the OECD), the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) and Public Services International (PSI).

A key role of UNICORN is to support TUAC in monitoring the OECD Anti-bribery Convention, which requires OECD countries to enact legislation that criminalises the act of bribing foreign public officials.

The OECD is responsible for monitoring the Convention. It is carrying out a series of country visits so as to assess the adequacy of measures put in place by member countries to support the Convention.

The next country to be reviewed is the USA. Trade union representatives, along with business and civil society, have been invited to participate at a consultation meeting on the 13th March 2002.

UNICORN is supporting the trade union contribution by compiling evidence that will help assess the extent to which multinational companies, and country governments, are complying with the Convention and its recommendations.

First, we are aiming to identify cases of bribery and corruption involving USA Multinationals operating overseas. On the web site, you will find a list of USA parent companies and foreign subsidiaries that have been – or are alleged to have been – involved in corruption and bribery either at home or abroad. We would be grateful if you could send any additional information relating to bribery or corruption, that you may have relating to these, or other, USA companies.

In addition, we wish to collect information on measures put in place by governments on issues, ranging from accounting practices to public procurement and whistle blowing legislation, which affect the overall effectiveness of the anti-bribery legislation. The information check-list (briefing 3) provides a complete list. If you are working in, or have information on, any one of these areas, then we would very much like to hear from you.

Corruption undermines democracy and inhibits development. The OECD Convention represents the first legally binding international instrument that aims to curb the behaviour of corrupt MNCs operating overseas. It is essential that trade unionists around the world give it their support.

briefing note 1: the oecd anti-bribery convention

What is the OECD Anti-bribery Convention?

The Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions came into force in 1999. Signatories, which include all 30 OECD members, as well as 5 non-members, accept both the binding commitments in the field of criminal law provided by the Convention, as well as the more general recommendations provided by the 1997 Revised Recommendations.

The Convention’s overall aim is to prevent bribery in international business transactions by requiring OECD countries to criminalise the act of bribing foreign public officials.

How is it monitored?

The OECD Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions is responsible for monitoring member countries’ compliance with the Convention, a process which is divided into two stages:

➢ Phase 1, which began in April 1999 and is now more or less...
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