Unprepared College Students

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Unprepared

Unprepared College Students
Carla Williams-Com220
Scott Downing-Instructor
April 25, 2010

Unprepared College Students
Carla Williams
COM 220

For most students, making it through high school seems like one of life’s most important accomplishments. And to others, the thought of gaining a college degree is a dream that has come true. Students that aspire to go to college are often unprepared to go to college for the lack of a challenging curriculum offered during the four years of high school. The problem with new college students is that some of them leave high school unprepared to take college level classes. New college students are excited and eager to head off into the next phase of their life only to become discouraged by rigorous college level courses. In the state of Texas, upon entering high school, the student meets with a guidance counselor to discuss class scheduling. The student’s academic ability usually decides which classes are compatible for them. It is important for the student to choose a plan or schedule because it affects the number of credits and focuses on Career and Technology education (CTE). The CTE was incorporated into the high school scheduling system to lower the drop out rate and potentially earn 10% more than non CTE participants according to a 2005 National Research and Technical Education Center report. According to the study by NCCTE in 2002, CTE concentrators usually have more math than general education concentrators and tend to do better on national test. The classes are designed to make the transition into college easier. Remedial classes are often used to stress the basics in a subject such as math or English. They are useful in helping students who are having problems with advanced concepts fully understand the basis of a subject. Remedial classes are often looked upon as shameful or embarrassing, but they can in fact be useful tools to a more complete grasp of difficult ideas or rules. A high school student should begin planning for his or her higher education as soon as possible. By doing things as simple as carefully outlining which courses should be taken or what activities to participate in, it can be really simple. If there is a particular institution a student shows interest in attending, they should begin looking at the admission requirements. In addition to courses taken and grades received, colleges and universities also consider extracurricular activities. It doesn’t matter if a student is active in sports, band, clubs, or other organizations, these extracurricular activities show a well-rounded individual who can juggle school work with other commitments. The students that have to take remedial courses have a hard time staying motivated and are likely to drop out of college. Each day, 3000 students drop out of high school, according to Alliance for Excellence Education. The report suggests, “A mix of CTE, academics and fine arts lowers the drop out rates for students because the course balance offers a broader array of experience that can identify and encourage a specific to success.” This graph shows that almost 40 percent of the students “special admits” are unprepared in writing up to 55% are unprepared in mathematics.

Large percentages of students, employers, and college instructors alike agreed students need more challenging course work in high school. This translated into a widespread support for raising the standards for the school districts. Eighty-two percent of college students, and 80 percent of working graduates, reported they would have worked harder in high school if their schools demanded more of them during the four years. Though higher education is now a near-universal aspiration, researchers suggest that close to half the students who enter college need remedial courses. Some students who need to catch up attend two- and four-year institutions simultaneously. Students who take...
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