Unix vs. Windows

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Abstract
For many, the UNIX family of operating systems seems to be have a smaller share of the market than Microsoft. This is not necessarily the case, since more internet servers and education servers are running UNIX than Microsoft Windows. In actuality, the server market share for both UNIX and MS Windows operating systems is almost balanced.

UNIX Family versus Microsoft Windows: Comparisons For Business Companies often face the issue of choosing a UNIX based system or a Microsoft Windows based system for their network Operating Systems. To many IT managers in today’s market, this can be an even more daunting task because there are often more opinions than facts available. Within this paper, the attempt is to clarify the differences to help an astute IT Manager make the decision with confidence. Most IT personnel, with the plethora of opinions, quickly tend to forget that all GUI operating systems stem from the same source. That source is the X(erox) Windows, which makes up the core of both groups of OSes on the market today. For this reason, understanding what truly sets the two groups apart can help companies be more confident with a choice of one over the other. For the purpose of the paper, we will compare the UNIX family of OSes (which includes Linux) to Microsoft Windows. UNIX is often a misunderstood and under-represented OS, other than Apple, Inc.’s OSX. Cost

Analyst firms have been releasing total cost of ownership calculations for leading operating systems, with Linux and Windows neck-in-neck for the low end, and UNIX numbers somewhere up in the stratosphere. Things get murky, when considering total cost of ownership costs, and to some extent, return on investment for these systems. Since it's almost impossible to calculate potential ROI for an operating system implementation, analyst firms have been concentrating on tracking total cost of ownership numbers for Linux versus UNIX versus Windows. What they're finding is Windows and Linux cost the same in hardware, with support costs tipping the equation one way or the other. However, analysts do not agree on whether Windows or Linux support costs more over the long run. Commercial UNIX is another story, which analysts say just plain costs more in both hardware and support. The cost for UNIX was $1,407 per user, compared to $256 for Linux. In an Internet or Web-based setting, the difference narrowed to $685 for Unix versus $377 or Linux. IDC cited hardware costs, accounting for the fact that older Intel-based processors could be recycled as Linux servers. Administrative costs also were higher for UNIX, due to greater complexity. The management decision to run UNIX or Windows will certainly be biased toward the operating system your administrators are most familiar with. A few reports that compare the cost of Windows with Linux state that even with the administration overhead and learning curve, Linux is still more cost-effective than paying for Windows. The power of UNIX may never be realized if the administrator doesn't already understand it. That's just how things are. That's also why good administrators can thoroughly test a service before it goes live. If you aren't locked into proprietary software, the cost performance benefits of Unix-based operating systems may well make it worthwhile to consider migrating some core services like e-mail and Web servers. Market Share

For many, the UNIX family of operating systems seems to be have a smaller share of the market than Microsoft. This is not necessarily the case, since more internet servers and education servers are running UNIX than Microsoft Windows. In actuality, the server market share for both UNIX and MS Windows operating systems is almost balanced. It was noted (Singh, 2004) that Microsoft Windows operating systems had 95% of the desktop operating system market. This has become important, as most companies prefer to stay within the same distributor for their server operating systems...
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