United States Constitution and Treaty Ratification

Topics: United States Constitution, United States Senate, United States House of Representatives Pages: 3 (793 words) Published: October 28, 2013
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Main article: Treaty
See also: List of treaties by number of parties
The ratification of international treaties is usually accomplished by filing instruments of ratification as provided for in the treaty.[1] In most democracies, the legislature authorizes the government to ratify treaties through standard legislative procedures (i.e., passing a bill). United Kingdom[edit]

In the UK, treaty ratification was a Royal Prerogative, exercised by Her Majesty on the advice of her Government. But, by a convention called the Ponsonby Rule, treaties were usually placed before parliament for 21 days before ratification. This was put onto a...
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