United States Constitution

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HIS/110 US History To 1865
Week 3 Assignment Constitution Paper

The weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation were pointed out by the Constitution. The Articles of Confederation were tweaked in May 1786. This introduced a set of fresh regulations for the central government. The declaration of Independence was approved by the Congress on July 4, 1776. The Constitution paid attention to the irregularities in the Declaration of Independence and replaced all direct mentions of slavery. The Great Compromise drew an end to the disagreements among the states and set congressional representation upon population on an equal basis. James Madison introduced The Bill of Rights to the first United States Congress on August 21, 1789 and was used by the House of Representatives. An outline to the Articles of Confederation was proposed by John Dickinson in 1776, establishment of a formal government in the colonies was introduced in this, the first of its kind. Thirteen states accepted The Articles of Confederation on March 1, 1781. The document of unification introduced a semblance of control to the central government. The Articles of Confederation helped address a feeble government system and pointed out a number of failures. Nonetheless, The Articles of Confederation offered very little success as a government tool. The U.S. Constitution was put in writing in 1787. The new U.S. Constitution attempted to address the unsuccessful failures of the Articles of Confederation. For example, the Congress had no authority to charge taxes on the states. The system relied on donations from the states. The notion of federal taxation was opposed by the states. This caused an overpowering rise in currency because Congress did not have proper funding. Another defect of Congress was that it failed be in command of the foreign commerce. As a result, merchants and consumers had to pay high prices. Though Congress did possess the power to pass regulations and laws,...