Unit 3 - Supporting Children

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E1. Five pieces of current legislation are:
1. Sex Discrimination Act 1975
2. Equality Act 2006
3. Childcare Act 2006
4. Race Relations Act 2000
5. Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001
E2. The Sex Discrimination Act 1975 states that we should not discriminate on the grounds of gender and that both genders should be treated equally with the same rights. This means that practitioners should involve boys and girls in all activities and should not make comments such as ‘Girls are more sensible than boys’. Equality Act 2006 provides a legal framework to protect the rights of individuals and advance equality of opportunity for all. That means that practitioners should treat all children as an individual and give children equal opportunities as children have individual needs that should be met. Childcare Act 2006 incorporates the welfare standards with which all settings registered to work with children under 8 years must comply, and also provides a learning framework for children aged 0-5 years called the Early Years Foundation Stage. The welfare requirements affect much of the day-to-day practice within settings, for example the adult to child ratio in rooms. Race Relations Act amended 2000 apply to discrimination on the grounds of colour, race, nationality and ethnic and national origins. It states that practitioners should give equal opportunities to all children no matter what their race, nationality and ethnic origin is. Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 states that practitioners should not treat disabled children less favourably than other children. It also states that schools must ensure that they make reasonable adjustments to ensure that children with disabilities are not placed at a disadvantage.

E3. Safeguarding is defined as: All agencies working with children, young people and their families taking all reasonable measures to ensure that the risks of harm to children's welfare are minimized. Policies and Procedures will help safeguard children by making sure that all steps are taken to protect children and young people from harm. To ensure this create an environment in the setting which encourages children to develop a positive self-image, regardless of race, language, religion culture and home background. Encourage children to develop a sense of autonomy and independence and enable children to have the self-confidence and the vocabulary to resist inappropriate approaches.

Following the correct procedures in the setting is essential because if there is an accident and you have followed all the correct procedures then the accident is not your fault; however if you haven't followed the correct procedures then you are responsible for any accidents that happen and the consequences are your fault.

Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 states that practitioners should not treat disabled children less favourably than other children. It also states that schools must ensure that they make reasonable adjustments to ensure that children with disabilities are not placed at a disadvantage

Another policy that will safeguard children is Health and Safety Policy. This policy aims to ensure that settings both inside and outside are secure, safe and healthy place for children, parents, staff and other people to be around in. This policy also aims to prevent accidents, injuries and ill-health, and it makes sure all staff is aware of potential hazards within the setting and the surrounding environment.

E4. An Inclusion policy ensures that all pupils are fully included in all aspects of school life and have an equal opportunity no matter what their gender, religion, race, background, specific difficulty or physical ability is. This policy aims to support the individual needs of each and every child recognising their rights and raising awareness.

By having a relations or partnership with parents’ policy in place a setting, helps a setting...
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