Unique Writing Styles Illuminated Through an Unrequited Love Story

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Every author has his or her own distinctive manner of writing. In the two short stories, “Araby” by James Joyce and “Interpreter of Maladies” by Jhumpa Lahiri, unique writing styles are showcased while relaying similar story lines. Both stories tell the narrative of men who fall for a woman and through a series of hopeful interpretations of interactions with the woman; they end up disappointed and alone. Although both stories have parallel themes of unrequited love, the way in which the authors use certain literary techniques to portray this theme differ greatly from each other. In both “Maladies” and “Araby” the main characters are taken through a series of emotional maladies while trying to peruse the girls they love. While each is told in a unique perspective, “Araby” is a narration of a boy as he is looking back on his life, presumably as an older man. On the other hand, “Maladies” is seemingly told through a much more current perspective. In “Araby” the narrator seems to have had time to reflect on his past, he reflects that he “thought little of the future.” Much of his story is composed of emotional and metaphorical responses to his situation. As the narrator is describing his feelings about the girl he like he says his “body was like a harp and her words and gestures were like fingers running upon the wires” (717). The author uses this type of language throughout the story to describe not only the feelings of the narrator but also to describe the setting. As he is waking through a crowd, he describes the walking “amid the curses of labourers, the shrill litanies of shop-boys who stood on guard by the barrels of pigs’ cheeks, the nasal chanting of street-ballad about troubles in our native land” (717). The predominant use of metaphors is used to bring the theme of the story to light. Joyce uses this writing style in order for the reader to paint his or her own picture of the more factual and objective parts of the story. Unlike Lahiri, who...
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