Unfinished Feasibility Study

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Project Proposal

Proramme/Project Title: Installation of Solar Bottle

Income: In 100 Home Family in Our Barangay 50,000 PESOS for overall income.

Start Date: April 3 to 18 (2 Weeks)

Background of the Project:

It is a simple bottle bulb, usually a 1 liter soda bottle that is filled with a solution of purified water and bleach. The bottle is inserted halfway through a hole drilled in the metal roof and its sides are sealed. The whole deal looks like a bulb through a sunroof and provides a good amount of light by deflecting sunlight into gloomy interiors. The chlorine and bleach “poisons” the water to keep molds from developing so the solution can last up to five years. The clear and purified water helps disperse the light through refraction, so the light is not concentrated. It only costs $2-3 to make a solar bottle bulb that is bringing light to dark homes.

Location/Target Population: Barangay, Tejeros Makati City

How to Implement the Solar Bottle Bulb?
The idea is actively being promoted by Barangay Tejeros Foundation Inc. in the City of Makati its “Isang Litrong Liwanag” Project which means ” A Liter of Light” and it was launched in other barangays in Metro Manila early this year. Isang Litrong Liwanag is a Philippines-based organization aiming to build indoor lighting in one million homes throughout the country by 2013. The Makati City government shouldered the expenses for making the bulbs while Barangay Tejeros Foundation trained residents on how to make them.

Objectives:
Because a thousands of poor homes in Manila have a problem, not uncommon for cramped and small settlements. These houses are so close together, with metal roofing that all the light is blocked off and no light reaches the homes even during daylight. This project and its success is a great example of the ‘market-based’ solutions that should be pursued for socio-economic problems worldwide, strategies that are smart, effective & resourceful. Components of the Project:

The materials used for this type of still should have the following characteristics: * Materials should have a long life under exposed conditions or be inexpensive enough to be replaced upon degradation. * They should be sturdy enough to resist wind damage and slight earth movements. * They should be nontoxic and not emit vapors or instill an unpleasant taste to the water under elevated temperatures. * They should be able to resist corrosion from saline water and distilled water. * They should be of a size and weight that can be conveniently packaged, and carried by local transportation. * They should be easy to handle in the field.

Although local materials should be used whenever possible to lower initial costs and to facilitate any necessary repairs, keep in mind that solar stills made with cheap, unsturdy materials will not last as long as those built with more costly, high-quality material. With this in mind, you must decide whether you want to build an inexpensive and thus short-lived still that needs to be replaced or repaired every few years, or build something more durable and lasting in the hope that the distilled water it produces will be cheaper in the long run. Of the low-cost stills that have been built around the world, many have been abandoned. Building a more durable still that will last 20 years or more seems to be worth the additional investment. Choosing materials for the components in contact with the water represents a serious problem. Many plastics will give off a substance which can be tasted or smelled in the product water, for periods of anywhere from hours to years. As a general guide, if you are contemplating using any material other than glass or metal in contact with water, you may perform a useful screening test by boiling a sample of the material in a cup of good water for half an hour, then let the water cool, and smell and...
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