Understanding Your Teaching Role

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This assignment covers legislation and codes of practice in teaching and learning, the 5 stages of teaching/training cycle and finally the importance of record keeping in teaching and learning.

We need to consider legislation and codes of practice in teaching and learning because it maintains a professional structure and brings standardization to all employment and other organisations. The legislation and codes of practice relevant to teaching and learning do impact on the training cycle as a whole in many ways.


It is essential for teachers/lecturers/trainers to adhere and comply with the legislation that governs their profession as these safeguards their rights and those of the learner. The two examples of legislation that I will focus on are: the Health and Safety at work Act and the Privacy and Data protection Act. I will briefly mention the Teaching and Higher Education Act to highlight its importance in governing the teachers’ code of practice.

The Health and Safety Act:
The importance of this act is that, it ensures that everyone is safe in working places. This act emphasizes the requirement that everyone in the work place has a responsibility to protect the safety of themselves and others. Employees have an obligation to take the necessary action or report any incidents that may cause harm to themselves and others. By reporting these, the employer who is responsible for the implementation of this act, can maintain and manage health and safety measures. In many work places, the employer usually delegates this responsibility to certain employees such as the Head of Department in secondary schools.

In my sector (education) health and safety is a mandatory training requirement at the induction of new employees (teachers and support staff). In the science department, it is essential that staff are adequately trained on how to deal with chemicals and other hazardous science experiments. Members of staff need to be trained so that they are aware of how to store and dispose of hazardous materials. Staff should be aware of how to deal with chemical spillages and generally how to prevent potential hazards.

Privacy and Data Protection Act:
This legislation outlines that personal information collected should be treated as confidential and only used for its intended purpose. Individuals have a right to know why their personal information is being collected. Data must be kept up to date and accurate. The company collecting the data has no right to pass that data onto a third party without the consent of the owner. The act also stipulates that data should be kept for a certain time frame after which it should be discarded.

In teaching and learning, information on learners is collected as part of enrolment. This includes personal data (students and parents), education history and performance data. This information is used only for the purposes of education and can be accessed by the relevant staff authorized to do so. The learner has the right to know who has access to the information.

In my current role (Science Technician/Lecturer) we keep data on students, parents, staff and some commercial companies. This data is kept under lock and key if it is in hard copy, and in protected databases if it is on computers. Data is updated regularly. Responsible staff members are trained on how to maintain and keep accurate records, as well as the legal implications that surround the confidentiality of such records.

Codes of Practice:
Examples of code of practice for a secondary school teacher or support staff are:

1. Child protection: every member of staff should be trained on how to protect children and be able to take appropriate action in the event that a child needs protection. 2. Risk assessments of fire and practical classroom activities...
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