Underlying Meanings within Children Stories

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 88
  • Published : March 25, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Underlying Meanings within Children Stories
People enjoy a good story. More importantly, children enjoy their fairytales. However, many of these stories have more morbid underlying meanings. Everyone should know, or at least be vaguely familiar with, the cute story of Winnie the Pooh and his friends in the Hundred Acre Woods. What people may not know, or may not have figured out, is that this particular story’s dark messages are mental disorders. Each character in Winnie the Pooh, according The Perfectionist, author of a biomedical blog, has a different mental disorder. Are these disorders going to affect the way kids view others and themselves?

The initial story line of Disney’s 2011 “Winnie the Pooh” is innocent enough. The movie starts off with the introduction of a young boy named Christopher Robin who has, as the narrator says, “a very active imagination.” However, Christopher Robin may have more than just that. He displays the common characteristics of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a condition in which one has trouble defining the line with perception of reality. Common symptoms, according to the medical dictionary, are delusions, hallucinations, and hearing voices based on the person’s behavior. All of Christopher Robin’s “friends” are depictions of his stuffed animals coming to life. He talks and interacts with them and each character responds back appropriately.

We are next introduced to Pooh. This is Christopher Robins’ “best friend.” Winnie the Pooh is a bear who is so obsessed with food, in particular honey, that he can be classified with an eating disorder. His consistent desire for honey interrupts his daily activities by not allowing him to think of other things besides filling his tummy. He thinks about it in his dreams, during the day, and even while he is attempting to complete another task. He...
tracking img