Underlying Beauty

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People perceive beauty differently from others depending on their standards of what they find attractive. While some people find beauty in certain places, objects, or people, others may not. Artists, in the same way, find inspiration to create new masterpieces depending on their standards of beauty. Inspiration to artists can come from what people normally see as beautiful, like a breathtaking landscape to what people find disgusting like a deceased animal. Artists like John Cage, Alexander McQueen, and Diane Arbus found beauty in what people would not normally find beautiful or acceptable. Cage, a composer and writer, always transformed what people might call noise to music in his mind. Every sound to him was pleasing and he treated it like it was a medium to create a work of art. Similarly, Alexander McQueen, a fashion designer, turned disturbing objects like animal flesh into beautiful clothes that the whole fashion world praised. Also, Diane Arbus, a photographer captured images of the misfits of society, showing her viewers that beauty had to be searched for in even the strangest places. Unlike others, these artists taught their audience to look beyond their standard of beauty and to open their minds to find beauty in anything and everywhere.

Everyday, people listen to sounds around them and find them either pleasing or intrusive to the ears. John Cage, however, finds beauty in every sound. What some people might call noise, he calls it music. In Searching For Silence, the author, Alex Ross, talks about Cage's conceptual work, "4'33"" and how it is suppose to "open the mind to the fact that all sounds are music" (Ross 1). Cage created it on his belief that "there is no such thing as silence", and made people sit in a concert hall to hear beyond the "silence". Cage's "4'33"" really got people to truly listen to what was around them and understand that there will always be some sort of sound that they hear even in "silence". Cage, through his works, tried to...
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